Athletics

How A's first-round pick Logan Davidson evokes Dodgers' Corey Seager

How A's first-round pick Logan Davidson evokes Dodgers' Corey Seager

The A's signed 2019 first-round pick Logan Davidson on Monday, and introduced him to the media prior to their game against the Orioles.

The Clemson shortstop was joined by his parents, sister, girlfriend and agent Scott Boras at the Coliseum.

"I know that the Oakland area likes Clemson people," Davidson quipped. "I thought that was pretty cool for sure with the Raiders and everything."

In case you missed it, three of the Oakland Raiders' nine 2019 draft picks -- Clelin Ferrell, Trayvon Moreau and Hunter Renfrow -- hail from Clemson University.

Davidson, who grew up in Charlotte, N.C., was asked to describe himself as a player.

"I'm a switch-hitter with power from both sides of the plate," Davidson told the media in Oakland. "I play the game with a little spark. Pretty good shortstop, I'd say. I like to play defense. I just get after it."

For A's director of scouting Eric Kubota, that description sounds like another kid from the Queen City who ended up being a first-round pick.

"I'm on record as saying he reminds me a bit of Corey Seager," Kubota said. "It's the same offensive profile, shortstop who can impact the game with his bat and the glove, so that's who I thought of."

Seager isn't a switch-hitter like Davidson, but the Dodgers shortstop went on to win NL Rookie of the Year in 2016 and has been named to two All-Star Games. So if Davidson can replicate Seager's talent, the A's have themselves a good player.

While the A's see a bit of Seager in Davidson, the 21-year-old patterned his game after a future Hall of Fame catcher.

"As a young kid, my dad and I liked Joe Mauer, so the left-handed swing is modeled after him with the balance and the smooth left-handed swing," Davidson said.

Now that Davidson has put pen to paper and been introduced to the media, he will begin his professional career Tuesday.

[RELATED: A's 'pleasantly surprised' Davidson was available]

A's general manager David Forst announced that Davidson will fly out to Burlington, Vt. and start playing for the short-season Vermont Lake Monsters.

"How quickly he moves is up to him," Forst said.

Why A's should either trade or non-tender All-Star Blake Treinen

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Why A's should either trade or non-tender All-Star Blake Treinen

Editor's note: Over the next two weeks, we will examine 10 A's players who may or may not return to Oakland next season. For each player, we will provide reasons why the A's should bring him back and reasons why they should not, followed by a final determination.

Blake Treinen, RHP

Contract: Final year of arbitration (projected to get $7.8 million after earning $6.4 million this season)

Reasons to bring him back

In 2018, Blake Treinen enjoyed one of the greatest seasons in MLB history. The right-hander went 9-2 with 38 saves and a 0.78 ERA, notching 100 strikeouts in 80 1/3 innings.

Unfortunately, Treinen followed that up with the worst season of his career, going 6-5 with a 4.91 ERA in 2019, ultimately losing the closer job to Liam Hendriks. Still, Treinen's stuff looked dominant at times and he could certainly bounce back in 2020.

Treinen is still just 31 years old and should have some productive years ahead of him. His fastball averaged 97 mph this season with explosive movement. If he can improve his command, Treinen could still be a productive reliever moving forward.

Reasons to let him go

Treinen is coming off an incredibly disappointing season. He entered the year as one of the top closers in baseball, but quickly lost his closer job due to injury and poor performance.

Treinen's 4.91 ERA, 1.62 WHIP, and 5.14 FIP were all career worsts, as were his 37 walks in just 58 2/3 innings. He saw his season come to a premature end when an MRI revealed a stress reaction in his back. And pitchers and back injuries don't mix well (see: Marco Estrada). Tendering Treinen a contract would be a major risk.

Final verdict

Treinen could very well return to being an effective relief pitcher, but the A's can't afford to take that chance for nearly $8 million. That money would be better spent on multiple relievers to help shore up the team's shaky bullpen.

[RELATED: A's stay or go candidate for 2020 season: Jake Diekman]

Between Treinen's on-field struggles and the injury concerns, Oakland would be better off seeking an offseason trade of its former All-Star closer. If the A's can't get a deal done, look for a non-tender.

Why Jake Diekman's command issues could mean A's move on in offseason

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Why Jake Diekman's command issues could mean A's move on in offseason

Editor's note: Over the next two weeks, we will examine 10 A's players who might or might not return to Oakland next season. For each player, we will provide reasons why the A's should bring him back and reasons why they should not, followed by a final determination.

Jake Diekman, LHP

Contract: $5.75 million mutual option for 2020 ($500,000 buyout)

Reasons to bring him back

Diekman's stuff is undeniable. The 32-year-old left-hander boasts a 96-mph fastball along with a wicked slider, making him a tricky at-bat for right-handed and left-handed hitters alike.

Despite a 1-7 record and 4.65 ERA this season, Diekman notched 84 strikeouts in just 62 innings. For his career, he has averaged 11.2 punchouts per nine innings.

Another reason to keep Diekman is Oakland's lack of left-handed relievers. Jesús Luzardo and A.J. Puk both figure to move to the starting rotation next year and Ryan Buchter's return is far from certain. As a result, Diekman could be the only southpaw in the A's bullpen.

Reasons to let him go

While Diekman's strikeout numbers were highly impressive, his lack of command became a major issue down the stretch. He walked 39 batters this season, including 16 in 20 1/3 innings with the A's.

That contributed significantly to Diekman's disappointing 1.42 WHIP and 4.65 ERA. For $5.75 million, you'd have to think the A's would want someone more consistent and reliable in the late innings.

[RELATED: A's 3B coach Williams will manage in Korea next season]

Final verdict

Oakland is unlikely to bring Diekman back next season for a couple of reasons. Far too often, he just doesn't know where his pitches are going. Throughout his career, Diekman has averaged five walks per nine innings. That's a serious problem for a setup man.

The other factor is Diekman's $5.75 million price tag. That is a high figure for any non-closer, but particularly worrisome for a setup man who has proven to be inconsistent.

The A's would probably be wise to spend that money elsewhere.