Giants

Source: Giants to put Buster Posey on disabled list

Source: Giants to put Buster Posey on disabled list

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Giants put Buster Posey on the seven-day concussion disabled list Tuesday, with Tim Federowicz getting called up to back up Nick Hundley. To clear a spot for Federowicz, who was not on the 40-man roster, right-hander Clayton Blackburn was designated for assignment. 

Posey was said to be feeling alright Tuesday, but the team committed to making the move out of an abundance of caution. There was no need to take any risks given Posey’s position, a source told NBC Sports Bay Area. 

Posey was hit on the back of the helmet by a 94 mph Taijuan Walker fastball in the first inning of Monday’s home opener. He sat down, waiting for trainer Dave Groeschner with a dazed look on his face. Groeschner immediately pulled Posey from the game and took him to the clubhouse for tests, which Posey passed. 

Posey told teammates that he felt normal, and that he was not experiencing the symptoms he expected. On his way out of the ballpark, Posey told NBC Bay Area that he felt fine. But the training staff monitored Posey overnight to make sure he did not have a delayed reaction. 

The Giants have embraced a much more proactive approach to concussions after several players suffered from late-showing symptoms in recent years. Brandon Belt missed 12 games with a concussion in 2014, returned too early, and then missed another 34 games after seeing a specialist. Joe Panik played for over a week after getting hit in the head last season and then ended up missing 23 games after he revealed that he didn’t feel right. 

Major League Baseball instituted a seven-day concussion DL for situations like this one, although it was unclear how much time Posey is expected to miss. He was set to address the media before Tuesday's game. 

Federowicz has played 106 big league games for the Dodgers and Cubs. He hit .323 this spring with seven doubles and did such a solid job with the staff that Bruce Bochy identified his group of four catchers as the deepest he has ever had. Federowicz reworked the late-March opt-out in his contract and accepted an assignment to Triple-A Sacramento. 

Trevor Brown was previously the third catcher on the 40-man roster, but he started the season on the DL with an ankle injury and in recent days he has been worn down by an illness. 

Blackburn, 24, won the Pacific Coast League ERA title in 2015 but he had a 4.36 ERA in 2016. A right-hander with a varied pitch mix and strong command, Blackburn seems a solid bet to find a 40-man job elsewhere. With the Giants, he had fallen behind other young starters like Ty Blach and Tyler Beede. 

Giants reliever, coach put calmer spin on pregame handshake

Giants reliever, coach put calmer spin on pregame handshake

We've all seen the pregame handshakes that are meant to fire up players. JaVale McGee was the designated handshake guy for the Warriors the last two years. He had custom handshakes with all the starters, including Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant.

Handshakes are supposed to have energy.

Someone clearly forgot to tell Giants reliever Sam Dyson and first base coach Jose Alguacil.

On Wednesday in San Diego, the pair were caught on camera engaging in a strange ritual in the dugout. As you can see in the video above, Dyson starts by wiping away any sweat on the bald dome of Alguacil with a towel. Then he gently places a batting helmet on Alguacil's now-dry head and dabs at it with the towel. After infielder Chase d'Arnaud sneaks in for a handshake with Alguacil, Dyson and Alguacil shake for a solid five seconds before placing a hand on each other's chest.

Hey, whatever it takes to get fired up for Game No. 153.

Giants' Brandon Crawford confident knee issue won't linger

Giants' Brandon Crawford confident knee issue won't linger

SAN FRANCISCO — The Giants have lost their starting catcher, first baseman and center fielder for the year due to injuries that have required or will require surgery. Two of their top three starting pitchers coming into the season are on the 60-day disabled list, along with their top bench bat. 

The injury updates this season have ranged from bad to catastrophic, but when it comes to the starting shortstop, the recent developments have been positive. After sitting out five games in eight days because of left knee discomfort, Brandon Crawford believes he has turned a corner. He’s confident that this is not something that will plague him long-term or next season, comparing it to right shoulder soreness that popped up four years ago but has been managed with proactive rehab. 

“Cartilage doesn’t grow back, but as long as I stay on top of it like the shoulder stuff, it shouldn’t be an issue,” Crawford said of his knee. 

The pain Crawford has been dealing with throughout the second half is under the kneecap, but the training staff has found some traction strengthening his quad muscle and doing other rehab work that loosens the IT band. The work Crawford has been doing is similar to what you would do during a DL stint, but Crawford never felt he could take that much time, even as his numbers cratered after an All-Star first half. 

“I probably should have spoken up about how much it bothered me, but I wanted to be out there every day,” he said. “We were trying to make the playoffs.”

Now, the Giants are simply trying to keep others out of the playoffs. Manager Bruce Bochy gave Crawford a night off Tuesday, but expects him in the lineup for all three games against the contending Cardinals this weekend. You can bet that a Bay Area native who grew up learning how to dislike the Dodgers will be in the lineup all three games next weekend, too. 

Crawford wants more than to just be in the lineup, of course. He was the hottest hitter in the National League for a long stretch in the first half and was batting .338 at his peak. The knee injury has kept him from utilizing his normal approach and sitting on his back knee. He was drifting with his swing, but in recent games the results have been better. Crawford had three hits Wednesday and has four multi-hit games in his last nine starts.  

Crawford’s numbers won’t end up anywhere near where they might have had he stayed healthy. Asked Wednesday if the knowledge he now has about his knee makes that easier or more difficult to swallow, he paused. 

“I guess in a way I’m glad there’s a reason for it and it’s not just that I forgot how to hit,” he said, smiling. “It’s something that I didn’t realize was affecting me this much until it was too late.”