Celtics

Celtics

BOSTON -- When Golden State Warriors guard Steph Curry recently questioned whether man had indeed landed on the moon in 1969, for many it was a reminder about the comments made by Celtics guard Kyrie Irving insisting the earth was flat

Regardless of whether you believe either conspiracy theory, athletes speaking out on issues outside of their respective sport has become a popular topic of discussion, one that Irving addressed head-on following the Celtics’ practice on Tuesday.

“I hate that it has to be a subject of something like that, where you’ve been taught science within our classroom things and as you get older,” Irving said. “You come into things that you have questions about. It’s natural to do that as an adult, as a kid or anything like that.”

But when players do address non-sports issues, there is a misconception often attached to their thoughts being invalid or not as valued as others.

And that often leads to a backlash that manifests itself via social media. 

“Anybody can say anything on Twitter,” Irving said. “But one thing someone says with a [blue] check next to their name [meaning they're verified on Twitter], and it’s the biggest thing going.”

 

Irving added, “I don’t live my life based on biases or judgments, or do I base it on judging someone on what they believe. It’s society. We live in American where people say s--- all the time about one another.”

And in doing so, it at times creates false perceptions about athletes.

“You end up getting caught up...on this false platform of a thing where you’re not even a human being anymore,” Irving said. “You’re extrapolated for all the information you know and think. Now you have to fit the mold of something you’re clearly not; you’re more than just a basketball player who puts the ball in the hoop, and then they subject you to being just that.”


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