Bears

What John DeFilippo’s red zone concepts could mean for Mitch Trubisky

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What John DeFilippo’s red zone concepts could mean for Mitch Trubisky

Mitchell Trubisky, meet John DeFilippo.

According to ESPN's Adam Schefter, the Bears have submitted an interview request for DeFilippo, the Eagles QB coach who's been largely credited with Carson Wentz’s development into an MVP-caliber QB in just Year 2 of his NFL career. 

With Trubisky heading into Year 2 of his career, the parallels are similar and the possibilities are salacious.

It shouldn't be assumed that a Wentz-like jump is imminent if the Bears do indeed ink DeFilippo, but one has to wonder how Trubisky's game can improve if the two are paired. One area where strides can be taken immediately is in the red zone.

"I am going to study the red zone even more to figure out how I can improve," Trubisky said after the Bears' Week 17 loss to the Vikings. "You always find out from each game what you did well, and what you need to work on, so I am going to go back through all the games and continue to look at those things.

"We have to find ways to score in the red zone to have a better chance of winning."

Well, DeFilippo may be of assistance in that department. 

The Eagles rank first in red zone touchdown scoring percentage at 65 percent. That's up from just 49 percent in Wentz's rookie season. 

Don't believe the numbers? You're going to want to watch DeFilippo thoroughly analyze the Philly's red zone offense right here

Sounds pretty convincing from here. 

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

It seems like an annual talking point at this time in the offseason: Bears nose tackle Eddie Goldman is one of the best yet most underrated players in Chicago. His performance in 2019 continued that career narrative. 

Goldman finished the year making 15 starts with 29 tackles and one sack. He earned the eighth-highest Pro Football Focus grade among all Bears defenders and remained the consistent run-stopping force in the center of Chicago’s defensive line. 

To be fair, Goldman wasn’t as dominant as he was in 2018, when his 89.1 PFF grade was one of the best at his position in the NFL. But in terms of his role with the Bears, he’s irreplaceable. 

Goldman is entering the third year of a four-year, $42 million contract and will quickly become a source of contract negotiations once again. If he has another strong season in 2020, GM Ryan Pace will have little choice but to lock him up on another extension. Sure, that seems like it’s way down the road, but big-time defensive linemen get paid big-time contracts; Pace has to be prepared. There are currently six defensive tackles making at least $14 million per season.

Quality nose tackles are hard to find. They don’t fill up the stat sheet and rarely do they ever become league-wide superstars; but the Bears’ defense simply wouldn’t possess the upside it does without Goldman anchoring the defensive line, and that remained true in 2019.

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

It seems like an annual talking point at this time in the offseason: Bears nose tackle Eddie Goldman is one of the best yet most underrated players in Chicago. His performance in 2019 continued that career narrative. 

Goldman finished the year making 15 starts with 29 tackles and one sack. He earned the eighth-highest Pro Football Focus grade among all Bears defenders and remained the consistent run-stopping force in the center of Chicago’s defensive line. 

To be fair, Goldman wasn’t as dominant as he was in 2018, when his 89.1 PFF grade was one of the best at his position in the NFL. But in terms of his role with the Bears, he’s irreplaceable. 

Goldman is entering the third year of a four-year, $42 million contract and will quickly become a source of contract negotiations once again. If he has another strong season in 2020, GM Ryan Pace will have little choice but to lock him up on another extension. Sure, that seems like it’s way down the road, but big-time defensive linemen get paid big-time contracts; Pace has to be prepared. There are currently six defensive tackles making at least $14 million per season.

Quality nose tackles are hard to find. They don’t fill up the stat sheet and rarely do they ever become league-wide superstars; but the Bears’ defense simply wouldn’t possess the upside it does without Goldman anchoring the defensive line, and that remained true in 2019.