Bulls

Schanowski: Bulls Holiday Wish List

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Schanowski: Bulls Holiday Wish List

Tuesday, December 22nd

by Mark Schanowski
CSNChicago.com

In the spirit of the holiday season, let's try to put the ugly memory of that 35-point collapse against Sacramento out of our minds, and come up with some much-needed Christmas gifts for the beleaguered Bulls. As always, your input is welcomed. Please post your gift ideas in the comments sections below.

JOHN PAXSONGAR FORMAN: MORE CAP ROOM.

As we've written consistently since the start of training camp, Paxson and Forman decided Ben Gordon was not worth 11 or 12 million dollars a season over 5 years. They decided to let Gordon walk, and try to get into position to offer a maximum contact to one of the top players available in the free agent class of 2010. My speculation is that Dwyane Wade is their number 1 target, but they will bid on Chris Bosh or Joe Johnson if Wade decides to stay in Miami. The problem is, the salary cap is expected to take a major drop next summer, from 57 million down to about 53 or 54 million. That means the Bulls are short of the cap room they need to make a maximum contract offer, unless John Salmons opts out of his 6.7 million dollar salary for next season. And with the way Salmons has struggled this season, that's looking more and more unlikely. He's unlikely to get a higher salary from another team in an overcrowded free agent market. So, the only way for the Bulls to free up more cap room is to trade one of their veteran players for an expiring contract andor draft picks. Paxson looked into trading Kirk Hinrich for cap space last season at the deadline, but changed his mind at the last minute. Hinrich could go this time around, but don't be surprised if the Bulls decide to trade Salmons instead. He looks like a player who's lost his confidence, and seems to be overwhelmed by the constant questioning from the large Chicago media contingent.

VINNY DEL NEGRO: AN INSIDE SCORER & A CONSISTENT LONG-RANGE SHOOTER

It would have been easy to say job security for Vinny, but when you think about it, he's been forced to operate with a flawed roster all season long. The loss of Gordon has hurt the Bulls in so many ways. They currently rank near the bottom of the league in scoring, field goal percentage and three point shooting. Without a true low-post scorer or consistent three point shooters, the Bulls have been easy to defend. Opposing teams just pack the lane to keep Derrick Rose from getting to the rim, and they challenge the Bulls perimeter shooters to beat them. So far, the Bulls haven't come up with any answers. Salmons and Hinrich have struggled to find their shooting touch this season, and free agent addition Jannero Pargo has been a non-factor because of nagging injuries and limited playing time. Vinny has been going with a seven man rotation in recent weeks, and he runs the risk of burning out his key players. Getting Tyrus Thomas back from injury will give the Bulls another rotation player, but Tyrus won't solve either of the two biggest problems facing the Bulls' offense.

BERNIE BICKERSTAFF: A FEW NEW SUITS

If the Bulls decide to make a coaching change, Bickerstaff is the most likely guy to take over on an interim basis. He's been a head coach and general manager in the league, and has the experience to make some changes in the way the Bulls run their practices and execute in games. Maybe he has some ideas on using Derrick Rose more effectively.

DERRICK ROSE: A BOOK ON HOW TO BE AN NBA STAR

There's no questioning Derrick's ability. He has all the qualities to be one of the best point guards in the league. The problem is that he's TOO unselfish. He says the job of the point guard is to pass the ball to open teammates, and let them do the scoring. Unfortunately, that doesn't work on this Bulls' team, especially with Ben Gordon not on the roster anymore. Derrick needs to decide the Bulls will only go as far as he can take them, and look for his opportunities to score every second he's on the court. Rose is the biggest attraction for potential free agents to come to Chicago, and he needs to show his peers he can handle the responsibilities of being the best player on the team.

JOAKIM NOAH: ANOTHER SUMMER OF OFFENSIVE WORK

No player on the Bulls roster has improved more than Noah. He dedicated himself to getting stronger and working on his offensive game this past summer, and the results have been amazing. With another off-season of work on his low-post game, Noah just might be able to make the jump to an all-star caliber NBA center. He has been the Bulls' MVP. so far this season.

LUOL DENG: GOOD HEALTH

Deng has also been a pleasant surprise this season. No one really knew what to expect from the 6th year forward coming back from a right leg stress fracture, but he has been a consistent scorer and also has done a good job rebounding. Deng is playing through a chip fracture of his left thumb, and so far, it hasn't affected his performance. If he can stay healthy, Deng gives the Bulls a solid insideoutside forward to go along with Rose, Noah and whatever free agent the Bulls are able to sign next summer.

JOHN SALMONS: CONFIDENCE

Salmons played the best basketball of his career last season, averaging 18 points a game for Sacramento and the Bulls, and then reaching an even higher level in the playoff series against Boston. The front office believed he would be able to move into the primary scorer role vacated by Gordon. But for whatever reason, Salmons got off to a terrible start this season, and he's been battling his confidence ever since. He needs to attack the rim more and try to get to the free throw line, instead of settling for so many standstill three-point jumpers that rarely go in.

BRAD MILLER: A DRINK FROM THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH

Miller gives it all he's got every night. Problem is, I'm not sure there's a whole lot left. Miller has been an over-achiever throughout his career, even making a couple of all-star teams. But too many times this season, he's been rooted on the floor, while younger more athletic players jump over his back for rebounds or beat him to loose balls. It was great to see him take out Rajon Rondo with that hard foul earlier this month, but you get the feeling Miller's court time will be reduced greatly with Thomas back in the rotation.

TYRUS THOMAS: COACHABILITY

We know Tyrus' athletic skills are off the charts, but so far, he hasn't been very receptive to taking advice from the Bulls' coaching staff. Thomas will be a restricted free agent at the end of the season, and you get the feeling he'll probably start to blossom on his next NBA team. But there is still four months left in this season, and Thomas needs to show the rest of the league that he can be an impact player at the power forward position, not just a guy who makes the highlight shows with an occasional dunk or blocked shot. If Thomas can take his game to another level, the Bulls should be an improved team during the second half of the season.

KIRK HINRICH: IMPROVED THREE POINT SHOOTING

Back in his days at Kansas, Hinrich was a deadly three point shooter who did some of his best work with the game on the line. So far in his NBA career, Hinrich has been an erratic shooter, who earned a big contract with his ability to run a team and play solid defense. But with Rose now entrenched at point guard, Hinrich needs to be more of a scorer, and his biggest contribution right now would be to hit his perimeter shots more consistently.

TAJ GIBSON: A SUMMER IN THE WEIGHT ROOM

Gibson has been terrific as an unheralded rookie out of USC. Whether he's used as a starter or a reserve, Gibson brings all-out effort, solid rebounding and a nice mid-range jump shot to the table. But he's still a little thin for the NBA game, and sometimes gets pushed out of position in the paint. Another summer with Erik Helland and the Bulls' weight training staff should help him tremendously. With Tyrus Thomas likely to leave the Bulls after this season, Gibson should have a long and successful run with the Bulls.

JANNERO PARGO: PLAYING TIME

It seemed like a smart move when the Bulls signed Pargo to a low money, free agent deal last summer to provide some instant offense off the bench. But Pargo hurt his back and hip early in the season, and fell out of the rotation, and he hasn't been able to find his way back in. With the Bulls struggling to find an outside shooting threat, it might be time to give the Chicago native some consistent minutes.

JAMES JOHNSON: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HEAD COACH

Johnson is the forgotten man on the roster, which is kind of surprising considering how the front office talked about him up on draft day. Del Negro doesn't have any faith in Johnson right now, and it looks like his rookie season will be pretty much a lost year. In his limited time, Johnson has been turnover-prone and frequently out of position, but on a Bulls' team pretty much waiting until next year, he should get some developmental minutes so the front office can see if he figures in their future plans.

AARON GRAY, LINDSEY HUNTER & JEROME JAMES: SOME READING MATERIAL FOR THOSE LONG NIGHTS ON THE BENCH

Hard to picture any of these players being on the team next season, unless Hunter moves into an assistant coach's role. And yes, Jerome James does come to the games. He's the seven foot guy wearing a casual suit without a tie. James ruptured his Achilles tendon about a year and a half ago. It could be the longest rehab in NBA history.

So, what would you suggest for the team that needs just about everything? Please post your comments in the section below or send me an e-mail. Have a safe and enjoyable holiday season, and let's hope for better basketball from the Bulls in the New Year!

Mark Schanowski hosts our Bulls pre- and postgame studio coverage with 15-year NBA veteran Kendall Gill. You can also watch Mark on SportsNite, Sunday through Thursday at 6:30 and 10.

Jabari Parker channels his inner Uncle Drew: This game is about getting buckets

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USA TODAY

Jabari Parker channels his inner Uncle Drew: This game is about getting buckets

The Bulls gave Jabari Parker a two-year, $40 million deal for good reason.

One, the Bulls had the salary cap space to get the deal done and had just about filled out their roster. The money wasn't going to be used elsewhere. Also, the second year of the deal is a team option which gives the Bulls some security should Parker not be able to stay healthy or play up to the standards such a salary commands.

Parker was given that money for multiple reasons. One of those reasons was not for his defense.

But, according to Parker, no one gets paid for their defense.

Speaking on 670 The Score on Wednesday, Parker was asked about whether he felt he had the ability and effort to defend in the NBA, something he hasn't done particularly well in four seasons.

"I just stick to my strengths. Look at everybody in the league. They don’t pay players to play defense," Parker said. "There’s only two people historically that play defense. I’m not going to say I won’t, but to say that’s a weakness is like saying that’s everybody’s weakness. Because I’ve scored 30 and 20 on a lot of guys that say they play defense.

"If you know the game, you also know that everyone’s a pro, right? And you know that certain guys have an average. No matter what you do, they still get that average. They pay people to score the ball, and I would hope that somebody scores the ball on me if they pay them that much. So, I’m not saying that to cop out or nothing. It’s the NBA. We’re professionals. Everybody scores. It’s just about limiting them as much as you can, trying to contain them."

Parker's right in one sense, that players are usually paid for their offensive output. There are also more tangible, easily read statistics on the offensive end than there are defensively. Heck, the Bulls gave $80 million to Zach LaVine and he was the team's worst defender last season.

But then again, defense matters. A whole lot, especially at a time when offenses are better than ever (thus making defenders more valuable). The final four teams in last year's playoffs were ranked 1st, 6th, 9th and LeBron James (29th) in defensive efficiency.

A day after Parker's comments the Celtics gave Marcus Smart a four-year, $52 million contract. He's a career 37 percent shooter and has made 29 percenet of his 3-pointers in four seasons.

So while Parker, a below-average defender, might not be entirely accurate, at least he's owning who he is. And if he scores like he did in Year 3, averaging 20 points before re-tearing his ACL, no one will care how he defends.

Kawhi Leonard joins Raptors in the East; it could be good news for the Bulls

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USA TODAY

Kawhi Leonard joins Raptors in the East; it could be good news for the Bulls

The best player in basketball left the Eastern Conference two weeks ago when LeBron James signed with the Lakers. Now another top-10 player in the league is on the move, as the Spurs dealt All-Pro Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors in exchange for DeMar DeRozan.

The Raptors, in essence, are going for it. General manager Masai Ujiri made a calculated decision that his current core - or more accurately, his top combination of Kyle Lowry and DeRozan - couldn't get over the hump. They've bowed out to LeBron James and the Cavs each of the last three years (including two sweeps) and, despite James moving to the West, now face legitimate tests in Boston and Philadelphia.

That's why Ujiri was willing to move DeRozan, the face of the franchise who had been with the team since he was drafted there in 2009, for a shot to get over the hump in the East. As talented as the four-time All-Star DeRozan is, he can't match what Leonard brings to the table on both sides of the ball. They also added wing Danny Green in the trade, making them a better team in the short-term.

That's where the Bulls come in.

Both Leonard and Green have one year remaining on their contracts. It's been well-documented that Leonard wants to play in his hometown of Los Angeles, meaning there's a better-than-not chance he plays just one season with the Raptors. Of course we saw what happened with Paul George and the Thunder, so never say never. It just appears likely at this point. Also, Green was more a function of making the dollars and cents work out in the deal; the 31-year-old probably isn't part of Toronto's long-term plans.

In other words, this could be Toronto's last shot. DeRozan had three years left on his contract, and Jakob Poeltl (also part of the deal) is entering the third year of his rookie contract. If the Raptors don't win in 2018 and Leonard bolts for the Lakers or Clippers, Toronto is looking at tearing it all down and entering, more or less, a rebuild phase. Both Kyle Lowry and Serge Ibaka will be on the final years of their contracts, and the team might be willing to build around young role players in Fred VanVleet, OG Anunoby, Delon Wright and Norman Powell.

That's certainly a team the Bulls could move past in the following two seasons. With a young core that includes Zach LaVine, Lauri Markkanen, Wendell Carter Jr., Kris Dunn and Jabari Parker - plus next year's first-round pick - the Bulls will be trending upward as the Raptors attempt to pick up the pieces on a potentially failed dice roll on Leonard. Had the Raptors run it back with DeRozan they'd at least have their core in tact through 2020 (and DeRozan has a player option for 2021).

So while the Raptors were going to be ahead of the Bulls in the standings regardless this year, their window to compete in the long-term closed by swapping DeRozan for Leonard. That's good news for the Bulls in the coming years.