Bulls

CSN to follow Simeon's quest for three-peat

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CSN to follow Simeon's quest for three-peat

This winter, CSNChicago.com will be providing exclusive coverage of the Simeon Career Academy boys varsity basketball team, ranked No. 1 in the nation by some media outlets.

The Wolverines, back-to-back defending state champions are the flagship program of Chicago high school basketball and have a rich history that includes consecutive state titles in 2006 and 2007, when they were led by point guard Derrick Rose.

This season, they have the No. 1 player in the nation again, junior Jabari Parker, but it's far from a one-man gang. Coach Robert Smith's squad also features Marquette-bound forward Steve Taylor, the top-ranked senior in the state, top-50 nationally-ranked junior guard Kendrick Nunn, junior transfer Jaylon Tate, a point guard ranked among the top 100 players in his class, and senior floor general Jaleni Neely.

While those are the main characters CSNChicago.com will be focusing on, the Simeon "family" is an equal-opportunity group, so such role players as junior starting forward Kendall Pollard, junior reserve point guard Lawrence Neely, backup senior guard Reggie Norris and two freshmen who are quietly touted as the future of the program -- wings Brandon Hutton and Dennis "D.J." Williams, who will play on both the sophomore and varsity teams -- will also receive attention.

Rose (when he pops up at his old school, which is something he's prone to do), the entire coaching staff and parents of the players, including Robert "Sonny" Parker, the father of Jabari and a former NBA player, will share time in the spotlight as well.

For now, however, here's some background on some of the key figures. Simeon opens its season Saturday night, with a game against south suburban power Hillcrest at the University of Illinois-Chicago.

THE SUPERSTAR: JABARI PARKER

Parker is the consensus top-ranked player in the nation in the junior class and arguably the best high school player in the country, regardless of class. Recruited by virtually every top-tier college in the country, he is remarkably humble and plays a team-first style of basketball. Tremendously skilled, he combines superb athleticism, strength down low, unselfish passing, accurate perimeter shooting and explosive slashing ability.

THE SENIOR LEADER: STEVE TAYLOR

Taylor is the only player in Illinois to rank among the top 100 seniors in the country. Signed with Marquette in the fall. A 6-foot-8 forward, he is just as capable of knocking down a deep three as he is to throw down a dunk in traffic, forming a deadly inside-outside duo with Parker.

THE FLOOR GENERAL: JALENI NEELY

Neely is a four-year varsity player who split minutes at his position the past two seasons, only to suffer a devastating ACL injury in the summer. Hoping to return to the linuep by the season opener, Neely is viewed by Coach Smith as one of the team's most indispensable pieces because of his knowledge of the game. A true, pass-first point guard, Neely's modest scoring average is outweighed by his playmaking ability and mistake-free style of play.

THE MICROWAVE: KENDRICK NUNN

Nunn, who committed and de-committed from Texas A&M this fall, wasn't a starter last season, but is viewed as one of the most explosive scorers around. An elite athlete with deep range and a fearless style of play, the southpaw shooting guard is highly coveted by a wide variety of colleges. His penchant for making big plays makes him the most exciting player to watch on the roster, a sentiment privately seconded by his idol, Rose.
THE TRANSFER: JAYLON TATE

Tate left De La Salle, a Catholic league power, to join forces with the Wolverines, but don't accuse him of hopping on the bandwagon for the personal benefits. Already a coveted prospect receiving attention from a long list of college programs, Tate is an athletic and gifted point guard, but must quickly catch on to a new system. Although he wasn't the only star at his previous school, it might be a difficult adjustment for Tate initially.

THE ARCHITECT: ROBERT SMITH

Smith is a low-key coach who blends being a disciplinarian and nurturing his players, a successful approach that has led to four state championships in less than 10 seasons. The Simeon graduate inherited the program from his own former coach, the late, legendary Bob Hambric, and it hasn't missed a beat in his hands. Ably aided by a coaching staff consisting of former players, the Wolverines' program is a well-oiled machine with a family atmosphere.

THE ALUMNI: DERRICK ROSE

The youngest MVP in NBA history. Instead of rehashing Rose's accomplishments -- two state championships, McDonald's All-American, 2007 Mr. Illinois Basketball -- during his time on 81st and Vincennes, here's a quote from the Bulls point guard from after his workout at the school Monday night:

"I've been coming up here a couple of times to work out. You already know they have great talent, a couple of players they already have on their team -- I don't need to mention their name, but the star of the nation; you already know who that is: Jabari -- and I think Rob and everybody, his coaching staff, has been doing a good job with coaching their team."

THE OBSERVER: SONNY PARKER

A former NBA player with the Golden State Warriors, the elder Parker himself is a Chicago high school legend from his exploits at Farragut (also Kevin Garnett's alma mater) on the West Side. Ironically, Parker tutored more than a few of his sons current teammates in his capacity of the head of the Sonny Parker Youth Foundation, a basketball program that includes weekend clinics, AAU competition before high school and competitive summer leagues. Parker and wife, Lola, are a constant, but not overbearing presence at Simeon.

Bulls Outsiders Podcast: Bulls fail to close another close game in loss to Raptors

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NBC SPORTS CHICAGO

Bulls Outsiders Podcast: Bulls fail to close another close game in loss to Raptors

On this edition of the Bulls Outsiders podcast, Matt Peck, David Watson, and John Sabine react to the Bulls 93-92 loss to Toronto.

0:45 - Reaction to losing another close game

2:00 - Kendall Gill stops by to give Matt Peck a hard time about Derrick Rose

3:30 - On Wendell Carter Jr and wanting more

4:45 - Viewer comment on Bulls shooting 46 three-point attempts

7:20 - Concern over Lauri Markkanen

8:10 - Viewer comment still believing in Lauri

9:40 - Viewer comment on Wendell Carter and Daniel Gafford

12:10 - Viewer comment on running more pick n roll w Zach and Lauri

15:35 - Viewer question on Otto Porter and Hutchison

16:30 - Viewer trade idea: Kevin Love for Markkanen

17:15 - Any comfort in coming close to beating two of the top teams in the East?

20:30 - Viewer comment on losing games

23:00 - Viewer comment on Coby should start

24:05 - Viewer comment pandering to John Sabine

24:40 - Sabine shares his weird dream that involves Jim Boylen

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

Dwindling attendance shows Bulls fans don't want moral victories

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USA Today

Dwindling attendance shows Bulls fans don't want moral victories

Following the Bulls’ second heartbreaking loss in as many nights, Jim Boylen had the floor.

“I coach by faith. I coach and teach every day on where I think we’re going to be. When that’s going to happen, when that’s going to break through, I’m not sure. But I’m going to keep coaching that way. We’ll watch from this, learn from it and grow,” a passionate Boylen said. “We’re playing good, hard basketball. We have to win two or three more possessions — one more defensive rebound, one more loose ball, one more open 3. That’s the difference in this. And I’m not going to let any negativity deter us from that mission. That’s what we’re going to do.”

And with that, the Bulls’ coach exited his postgame news conference, an atypical move for one of the more accessible coaches in the league.

Nobody could fault Boylen. At this point, people are tired of words anyway. And judging from the announced attendance of 14,775, the smallest since Dec. 16, 2004, people are tired of the Bulls’ losing ways, too.

Most any coach in the NBA brings his starters back with 6 to 8 minutes to go, as Boylen did with the Bulls leading by eight. Most any coach in the NBA goes to his most talented player, as Boylen did in calling Zach LaVine’s number, with the game on the line.

In the broken record department, the starters, with Denzel Valentine in for an ineffective Kris Dunn, coughed up another fourth-quarter lead. LaVine, who went scoreless in the second half after scoring 20 points in the first, missed over a double-team near the buzzer.

Making matters worse? LaVine afterward said he should’ve passed to a wide-open Daniel Gafford, in for the fouled-out Wendell Carter Jr.

“I saw Marc Gasol there. I tried to get him in the air and draw a foul. I’ve looked at now. I just wish I would’ve took an extra dribble to see the double-team on me,” LaVine said. “I could’ve hit Daniel. I could’ve kicked it back out. I thought I was making the right play by trying to get in the air and get to the free throw line. It just didn’t happen.”

How are these for some disturbing numbers? Valentine, who wasn’t even in the rotation until recently, took as many fourth-quarter shots as the four starters who played. The bench outscored the starters 18-3 in the final period.

For contrast, the Raptors’ starters scored 18 of their 22 fourth-quarter points.

The Bulls are going to keep recording moral victories, not real ones, until they learn how to close games.

“The starters’ job is to come back in, get re-engaged in the game and close it out. That’s what they did. They brought their guys in and they closed the game out,” Boylen said, alluding to the Raptors. “We have to learn to do that. We’re close. We’re right there. That’s the next step.”

To LaVine’s credit, he’s playing through a shoulder that Boylen called “banged up,” even though it hasn’t landed him officially on the injury report. He also briefly got the wind knocked out of him when OG Anunoby blocked his shot from behind and elbowed him in the back.

“We’re fine. Obviously, you’re upset in the moment. But it’s not like we’re not playing with these teams and competing with them all the way down to the fourth quarter,” LaVine said. “It shouldn’t have even been a one-point possession but that’s what we were left at and we just didn’t make the play.

“It feels like a little bit of a broken record. This is our job. We have to compete every time on the floor.”

The Bulls are on a three-game losing streak by a combined eight points. LaVine has missed game-winning attempts twice in the last three games. They still have yet to beat a team with a winning record.

“I can’t speak for everybody or the fans. I get a lot of positive feedback about our group,” Boylen said. “I think people understand what we’re trying to build. It’s disappointing when we don’t win games. It’s disappointing when we don’t win home games. Nobody is running from that. But this team is playing hard and competing and learning and growing. I think people can see that too.

“We’re going to keep pounding the rock and playing hard and working at it. I’m confident we’ll break through.”

It’s Boylen’s job to remain positive. Is anybody else confident?

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