Cubs

Why Cubs core's desire to sign extensions might not matter anymore

Why Cubs core's desire to sign extensions might not matter anymore

The day after Kris Bryant suggested that first-time fatherhood and the dramatic reality of world events have changed how he looks at his future with the Cubs, general manager Jed Hoyer outlined why it might be all but moot.

Setting aside the fact that the Cubs aren’t focusing on contract extensions with anyone at this time of health and economic turmoil, the volatility and unpredictability of a raging COVID-19 pandemic in this country and its economic fallout have thrown even mid-range and long-term roster plans into chaos.

“This is without question the most difficult time we’ve ever had as far as projecting those things,” Hoyer said. “All season in projecting this year, you weren’t sure how many games we were going to get in. Projecting next season obviously has challenges, and who knows where the country’s going to be and the economy’s going to be.”

Bryant, a three-time All-Star and former MVP, is eligible for free agency after next season. He and the club have not engaged in extension talks for three years. And those gained little traction while it has looked increasingly likely since then that Bryant’s agent, Scott Boras, would eventually take his star client to market — making Bryant a widely circulated name in trade talks all winter.

MORE: Scott Boras: Why Kris Bryant's free agency won't be impacted by economic crisis

The Cubs instead focused last winter on talks with All-Star shortstop Javy Báez, making “good” or little progress depending on which side you talked to on a given day — until the pandemic shut down everything in March.

Báez, Anthony Rizzo and Kyle Schwarber are also eligible for free agency after next season, with All-Star catcher Willson Contreras right behind them a year later.

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Exactly what the Cubs are willing to do about keeping any of those players long-term, even if MLB pulls off its 60-game plan this year, is hard for even the team’s front office executives to know without knowing how hard the pandemic will continue to hammer America’s health and financial well-being into the winter and next year.

Even with a vaccine and treatments by then, what will job markets look like? The economy at large? The economy of sports? Will anyone want to gather with 40,000 others in a stadium to watch a game anytime soon?

And even if anyone could answer all those questions, who can be sure how the domino effect will impact salary markets for athletes?

“There’s no doubt that forecasting going forward is now much more challenging from a financial standpoint,” Hoyer said. “But that’s league-wide. Anyone that says they have a feel for where the nation’s economy and where the pandemic is come next April is lying.”

The Cubs front office already was in a tenuous place financially, its payroll budget stretched past its limit and a threat to exceed MLB’s luxury tax threshold for a second consecutive season.

And after a quick playoff exit in 2018 followed by the disappointment of missing the playoffs in 2019, every player on the roster was in play for a possible trade over the winter — and even more so at this season’s trade deadline without a strong start to the season.

Now what?

For starters, forget about dumping short-term assets or big contracts for anything of value from somebody’s farm system. Even if baseball can get to this year’s Aug. 31 trade deadline with a league intact and playing, nobody is predicting more than small level trades at that point — certainly not anything close to a blockbuster.

After that, it may not get any clearer for the sport in general, much less the Cubs with their roster and contract dilemmas.

“We have a lot of conversations about it internally, both within the baseball side and then with the business side as well,” Hoyer said. “But it’s going to take a long time and probably some sort of macro things happening for us to really have a good feel for where we’re going to be in ’21 and beyond.”

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Cubs' Javier Báez, wife Irmarie are expecting a second child

Cubs' Javier Báez, wife Irmarie are expecting a second child

Cubs shortstop Javier Báez made a big announcement on Monday: he and his wife, Irmarie, are expecting a second child. 

Báez revealed the news in an adorable social media post with the help of his 2-year-old son, Adrian.

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Congrats to the Báez family!

RELATED: Javy Baez's 1-year-old son already has all the makings of a baseball superstar

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Cubs GM Jed Hoyer on unrest in Chicago: 'There's so much tension in the world'

Cubs GM Jed Hoyer on unrest in Chicago: 'There's so much tension in the world'

Cubs manager David Ross learned on Monday of the previous night’s unrest in downtown Chicago from his players. Some lived close enough for it to wake them up.

“I just listened to their stories,” Ross said. “I just feel like every day there’s something new. And I hope … our world gets back to being better in so many ways: health, society, emotionally, trying to get back to loving one another as best we can, as human beings.”

Police, responding to a call about a man with a gun, shot a young man in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood on Sunday afternoon. According to police, the individual was 20 years old and shot first as he fled from a confrontation. The officers returned fire. The young man was taken to the hospital and is expected to survive, according to Chicago police Superintendent David Brown.

CPD Deputy Chief Yolanda Talley told reporters that misinformation about the age of the individual spread. Investigators said the same misinformation sparked the destruction downtown in the early hours of Monday morning.

Hundreds of people gathered downtown, vandalizing and looting stores along the Magnificent Mile and surrounding areas. More than 100 people were arrested. A civilian and a private security guard were shot, according to the Chicago Tribune. Thirteen police officers were injured.

“There's so much tension in the world right now,” Cubs general manager Jed Hoyer said, “between the economy, unemployment numbers and COVID, just a constant sense of anxiety is over your daily lives, that violence… is going to happen with all this tension.

“And I think that the hope is that we can release that tension here hopefully soon, whether it's through a vaccine, or through controlling the virus better or improving the economy because with so much tension on everyone's lives right now, it's a sad end result of what's happening.”