Bears

Giants' player accused of abusing son

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Giants' player accused of abusing son

From Comcast SportsNet
GADSDEN, Ala. (AP) -- Authorities are investigating a report that New York Giants linebacker Michael Boley physically abused his 5-year-old son in Gadsden, Ala., his hometown. Etowah County District Attorney Jimmie Harp said Tuesday an investigation into the allegations made by the child's mother has just begun and evidence will be presented to a grand jury if it's determined there's probable cause. "We've just been presented with some allegations that there was some child abuse inflicted on one of his kids here in Gadsden," Harp said. Harp said he has not yet interviewed Boley. The New York Times initially reported the accusations. Boley's attorney, Randall Kessler of Atlanta, says the child's mother didn't raise the allegations during a Sept. 27 child support hearing. "During our entire trial on her request for child support, the only thing the mother asked the court to do was to increase the child support to five times what it currently is since Mr. Boley is a highly paid NFL player," Kessler said. "There was no evidence presented of any increased needs of the child. It was a simply a case of he makes a lot of money, so he should pay a lot of money.'" Boley is in the third year of a five-year contract with the Giants worth about 25 million. Giants spokesman Pat Hanlon said the team is aware of the allegations, but had no further comment. Kessler said abuse was alleged to have happened between May 30 and June 5. He said a Georgia woman recently asked for Boley's contact with their child to be supervised, but didn't an file emergency request. He said no hearing has been scheduled. Boley was also arrested in May 2008 on battery charges after his wife, Chantelle, told police he "became physical" with her during an argument. He was suspended for one game by the NFL for violation of the league's personal conduct policy, but the case didn't go to court.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Who deserves the blame in the Bears loss to Miami?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Who deserves the blame in the Bears loss to Miami?

David Haugh, Adam Jahns and Patrick Finley join Kap on the panel. The Bears lose a rough one in Miami as Matt Nagy goes conservative at the end zone. Does the rookie coach deserve all of the blame? Dave Wannstedt joins the guys to discuss.

Plus the guys discuss the Cubs’ newest hitting coach/scapegoat, Brandon Saad’s upcoming healthy scratch and Bobby Portis betting on himself this season. 

Listen here or in the embedded player below!

Cubs executive Jason McLeod reportedly linked to Giants' GM opening

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USA TODAY

Cubs executive Jason McLeod reportedly linked to Giants' GM opening

Is this the offseason that Cubs executive Jason McLeod finally becomes an MLB general manager?

According to Bruce Levine, the Giants are reportedly interested in McLeod, the Cubs senior vice president of scouting and player development, for their vacant general manager position.

McLeod joined the Cubs' front office in 2011 alongside Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer. Before the Cubs, he spent six years in the Red Sox front office and two in the Padres' (with Hoyer, who was San Diego's general manager from 2010-2011). 

Of course, the Giants' reported interest in McLeod doesn't necessarily mean that he will interview for the job. However, it's worth noting that McLeod interviewed for the Twins' general manager job in 2016; he also withdrew his name from consideration for the Padres' general manager job in 2014. 

In addition to the Giants, McLeod's name has been linked to the Mets' general manager vacancy. This is more speculation, but the point is that it seems to be only a matter of time before McLeod is hired as general manager elsewhere.

For what it's worth, though, McLeod is under contract through 2021 and has previously said that he is grateful to be with the Cubs. 

“I’m exceptionally grateful,” McLeod said. “All of us are. Look at where we are at this moment in time with this team," McLeod said in 2016. "I can’t imagine a better environment, a better culture to work at in baseball.

"We’ve been together a long time. We’re friends. We’re good. We embrace the fact that we are good. And we challenge ourselves to be even better.”