Cubs

Olympic Stadium tower ripped by London critics

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Olympic Stadium tower ripped by London critics

From Comcast SportsNet

LONDON (AP) Critics say it looks like a roller coaster gone badly awry. Fans say it's a landmark to rival the Eiffel Tower.

London got a towering new venue Friday, as authorities announced completion of the Orbit, a 115-meter (377- foot) looped and twisting steel tower beside London's new Olympic Stadium that will give visitors panoramic views over the city.

Some critics have called the ruby-red lattice of tubular steel an eyesore. British tabloids have labeled it ''the Eye-ful Tower,'' ''the Godzilla of public art'' and worse.

But artist Anish Kapoor and engineer Cecil Balmond, who designed the tower, find it beautiful.

Belmond, who described the looping structure as ''a curve in space,'' said he thought people would be won over by it.

''St. Paul's (Cathedral) was hated when it was begun,'' he said. ''Everyone wanted a spire'' - but now the great church's dome is universally loved.

He said if a groundbreaking structure works ''it starts to do something to you and your concept of beauty changes.''

Kapoor noted that Paris's iconic Eiffel Tower was considered ''the most tremendously ugly object'' by many when it was first built.

''There will be those who love it and those who hate it, and that's OK,'' Kapoor said of the tower, whose full name is the ArcelorMittal Orbit, after the steel company that stumped up most of the 22.7 million pound (36.5 million) cost.

''I think it's awkward,'' Kapoor said - considering that a compliment. ''It has its elbows sticking out in a way. ... It refuses to be an emblem.''

A little awkwardness is to be expected when you ask an artist to design a building. Kapoor, a past winner of art's prestigious Turner Prize, is known for large-scale installations like ''Marsyas'' - a giant blood-red PVC membrane that was displayed at London's Tate Modern in 2002 - and ''The Bean,'' a 110-ton (100-metric ton) stainless steel sculpture in Chicago's Millennium Park.

Even for him, though, the scale of the Orbit is monumental.

He says the structure can only truly be appreciated from inside - something most of the public will not have the chance to do until 2014, when it reopens as the centerpiece of a brand-new park on the site of the 2012 London Olympic Park.

Before that, it will be open to ticketholders for this summer's Olympic and Paralympic Games, whop can ride the elevator to the top at a cost of 15 pounds (22).

Kapoor said visitors would enter a ''dark and heavy'' steel canopy at base before emerging into the light high above ground, where a wraparound viewing deck and a pair of huge concave mirrors create ''a kind of observatory, looking out at London.''

''It's as if one is in an instrument for looking,'' Kapoor said.

London Olympic organizers hope the Orbit, which can accommodate up to 5,000 visitors a day, will become a major tourist attraction.

It is, they note proudly, the tallest sculpture in Europe - and 22 meters (72 feet) higher than the Statue of Liberty. On a clear day, views from its observation deck extend for 32 kilometers (20 miles) across London and the green hills beyond.

The tower will be at the heart of a new 227-hectare (560-acre) park, the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, that will include a lush river valley, biking trails and a tree-lined promenade. It is due to open in stages starting in July 2013 and finishing in early 2014.

London Mayor Boris Johnson takes credit for pitching the idea of a tower to steel baron Lakshmi Mittal at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland in 2009. He is a huge fan of the finished product.

''It is a genuine Kapoor,'' Johnson said. ''It has all the enigmatic qualities of some of his great pieces.''

And he believes other Londoners will come to love it, too.

''I think so,'' he said, then paused. ''In the end.''

Kris Bryant's injury looms large as Cubs finish home stand in underwhelming fashion

Kris Bryant's injury looms large as Cubs finish home stand in underwhelming fashion

There are 162 baseball games in a season and some days, you’re just not going to have it. On Sunday afternoon, in a 10-2 loss to the Reds, the Cubs just didn’t have it. 

“It’s already in the trash can...” Maddon said. “... so let’s flush it out and move on.” 

Things were bleak from the very first at-bat of the game, when Kyle Schwarber took a 3-2 fastball looking for one of his three strikeouts on the day. Anthony Rizzo was the only starter not to strike out at least once, as the Cubs’ finished with 11. Reds starter Tanner Roark was responsible for 9 of them, his season-high. 

Things weren’t much better on the basepaths or in the field. Besides making two errors, Anthony Rizzo was thrown out at the plate in the 2nd inning and David Bote got doubled-up at first after drawing a walk in the 6th. The Cubs were playing playing their 13th game in 13 days, and it showed.

“I feel really good about how we’ve been playing until today,” Maddon said. “This whole month we’ve been in almost every game except for this one, and maybe the [7-0 loss on May 10th] against Milwaukee. There’s not a whole lot to be upset about, and I’m not. I just want to make sure everyone’s well moving forward.” 

There was a scary moment in the 6th inning, as Kris Bryant and Jason Heyward collided in the right field gap while trying to make a play on a fly ball from Eugenio Suarez. Bryant was slow to get up and eventually had to leave the game. He’s still being evaluated for a head/neck injury, and the Cubs don’t yet know if he’ll go into concussion protocol. For what it's worth, Bryant was cleared to fly with the team. 

“He’s doing okay,” he said. “He’s still under evaluation. We don’t know exactly what we’re doing with this whole thing yet, but we’re trying to talk with the doctors and find out exactly where we’re at.”

“We collided, and I called for the ball,” Heyward added. “We were both going hard to make a play and ran into each other.”

The loss dropped starter Jose Quintana to 4-4 on the season. Quintana went 5.1 innings while allowing six runs on 12 hits with one walk and two strikeouts. Despite relatively weak contact, the Reds hit well all weekend. Their 42 hits over three games was the most for them in a three-game series at Wrigley since 1976, and they finished the weekend with a .404 BABIP. 

“Yeah, I just had to keep pitching, you know?” Quintana said. “Keeping my focus. It was really tough - too many base hits. In some contests that happens. I just try to stay close in the game.” 

The Cubs finished their 7-game homestand at 3-4, and now hit the road for a two-city trip. Up first comes the 35-19 Astros, who are 20-7 at home. This season Houston ranks first in on-base percentage, second in slugging percentage, and third in home runs. Their closer, Ryan Pressley, has the lowest ERA of all qualified relievers and is fresh off a streak of 40 straight scoreless appearances.

“I’m excited,” Joe Maddon said before Sunday’s game. “Let’s get by today, but I’m excited for the whole week. Look at our schedule - it’s been pretty firm, and it continues to be pretty firm. And that’s the way it should be. I’m looking forward to it.” 

ICYMI: Kris Bryant leaves Sunday's game, Tim Anderson scratched from White Sox lineup for second-straight game

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NBC Sports Chicago

ICYMI: Kris Bryant leaves Sunday's game, Tim Anderson scratched from White Sox lineup for second-straight game

Here are some of the Chicago sports stories you may have missed from the weekend.

Cubs

Over the weekend the Cubs lost a series 2-1 to the Cincinnati Reds, with pitching being a serious concern, as the Cubs gave up 22 runs over three games.

In their lone win from the Reds series, the Cubs put up eight runs to overcome the Reds, and were boosted with a surprise relief pitching appearance from one Tyler Chatwood.

Yu Darvish has shown signs of being able to turn things around, with his cutter looking like it could lead to a bounce back season. Ultimately, fans will be holding their breath, hoping that Kris Brynat is healthy following his collision in the outfield with Jason Heyward on Sunday. While we wait for updates, fans no doubt have plenty to think about courtesy of manager Joe Maddon. The always quotable Maddon had some interesting things to say on the popularity of the MLB game and the MLB's absurd home run rate

White Sox

The White Sox had quite the eventful week despite being beat handily in three straight games by the AL Central leading Minnesota Twins.

Before the tough series against the Twins, the White Sox split a series with the Astros, getting a gem of a complete game performance from Lucas Giolito. The south siders suffered a huge blow to their catching depth as Wellington Castillo went to the IL, resulting in a call up from Seby Zavala. 

Other sports

The Blackhawks have made some signings this offseason, but have yet to formally announce them. There are lots of huge decisions looming over the franchise this offseason, including what to do with the No. 3 overall pick in the 2019 NHL Draft. Our Charlie Roumeliotis tackles these topics and much more in our latest Blackhawks Mailbag

There has been much discussion over what the Bulls should do with the No. 7 pick in the draft. Our Mark Strotman did a deep dive into the history of the Bulls moving up and down in the draft to give us an idea of what may lie ahead.

We also discussed the draft with ESPN college basketball analyst Jordan Cornette, and did breakdowns of some of the options the Bulls could have with their second round pick, their first round pick and if they were to trade down in the draft

Khalil Mack could be in for an even bigger season next year following an offseason full of practices with the Bears creative coaching staff. Our JJ Stankevitz breaks down just how Mack can reach his absolute peak in 2019.