White Sox

Random News of the Day: Me, myself and I (and Brett)

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Random News of the Day: Me, myself and I (and Brett)

Thursday, Aug. 19, 201012:40 PM

By Joe CollinsCSNChicago.com
I would like to show you an excerpt of my column from Aug. 20, 2009:

From The Research Department: I found a full copy of Brett Favre's introductory press conference from Tuesday August 19th and I found that Queen Favre used the words "I", "I've", "I'm", "I'll", "Me", "My", "Myself" or "Mine" a combined 235 times. Just the "I" words alone were uttered 191 times. And amazingly, that number is twice as much as the amount of times he used the word "the" (90). The tally:I - 180I've - 4I'm - 6I'll - 1Me - 22My - 18Myself - 3Mine - 1And get this -- the number of times he used the word "we" in that same press conference? Only 19. Or how about the number of times he used the word "us"? ZERO.
Fast-forward to Wednesday. Same scenario. Same podium. Same goofy grin. Same aw-shucks-I'm-back routine. Same Q&A nonsense a day after TV news stations followed Favre from the airport to the Vikings training facility. Sound familiar? Makes me wonder if his 2010 introductory press conference was any different word-wise than the one from last year. The Minnesota Vikings Web site has a transcript of Brett's comments.

Let's break it down:

I: 240
I've: 7
I'm: 23
I'll: 6
I'd: 3
Me: 19
Mine: 3
My: 22
Myself: 3
We: 35
Us: 7
Team: 19
OurOurs: 4

Hey look! He actually used the word "us" seven times! He's getting better!

But not really. A couple of interesting points to ponder:

Brett Favre used a form of the word "I" (I, I've, I'm I'll, and I'd) a combined 279 times. His press conference was 33 12 minutes long. That works out to an average of 8.32 "I" words per minute. If you want to tack on the "Me" words (me, mine, my, myself), the average soars to 9.73 "selfish" words per minute.

Favre was asked about the Jeep story with Ryan Longwell (sixth question in the press conference). He answered the question using the word "I" 59 times in his answer. Fifty ... nine. Try duplicating that. I dare you.

Anybody else find it amusing that he used the words "me" and "team" the same number of times (19)?

In fairness, Favre's actions truly speak louder than his words. Two-hundred-eighty-five consecutive starts -- or 309 if you count the playoffs -- tells you that alone. The guy can play. Might throw a wobbler into double-coverage every now and then, but he still can play. And I'm sure most Vikings fans would welcome him in right now, given the current talent at the quarterback position.

But his selfishness and self-centeredness, intentional or not given the situation, especially considering the media hype, is beyond repair. I have seen a myriad of reactions by my fellow sports producers and other friends, which have ranged from the passive-aggressive ("Ha ... another news crew following Brett in a black SUV going down a highway. I wonder if he's in the back seat talking with O.J") to the flat-out aggressive ("GIVE me the remote! I'd rather watch 'Cheaters' or 'Maury Povich' right now").

I also feel sorry for my fellow sports journalists in the Twin Cities that have to put up with this annual media circus. I can't imagine the stress level involved for having to follow every breath he takes (cue that song from The Police). Maybe they like this kind of adrenaline rush, I don't know. But whether you're a Brett Favre fan or not, you have to be shaking your head at this mind-boggling showcase of self-centeredness year in and year out. It borders on nauseating. But we all fall for it in some capacity. You get vacuumed into the hype machine and there's not much you can do about it. No matter what, the guy's star power has some kind of impact on you as a sports fan.

I can tell you how it plays a role in my life: the movie "There's Something About Mary" is forever tarnished. Even though Favre has a minor role, it's enough for me to temporarily change the channel.

To "Cheaters", maybe.

Or something like that.

Joe Collins is an assignment desk editor for Comcast SportsNet and contributor to CSNChicago.com.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Emotional interview with Michael Kopech and Vanessa Morgan

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USA Today

White Sox Talk Podcast: Emotional interview with Michael Kopech and Vanessa Morgan

Chuck Garfien and Ryan McGuffey speak with Michael Kopech and his wife Vanessa Morgan at SoxFest about their relationship, Michael’s comeback from Tommy John surgery, his battles with mental health, removing himself from social media, handling fame, Morgan’s acting career and more.

Listen here or via the embedded player below:

White Sox Talk Podcast

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Jim Boylen standing firm at moment of reckoning in Bulls season

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USA Today

Jim Boylen standing firm at moment of reckoning in Bulls season

It’s no secret that the Bulls’ season hangs in the balance. At 17-30, the team is at once three games out of a playoff spot and slated ninth in the current lottery standings. 

To hear head coach Jim Boylen and co. tell it, a playoff berth remains the more desirable of those two timelines. But according to Basketball Reference, the Bulls have the third most difficult remaining strength of schedule in the East. And worse, they’ll have to face the (immediate) future without Lauri Markkanen, Wendell Carter Jr., Otto Porter Jr. and Daniel Gafford.

The loss of Markkanen — the most recent of that group to go down — has tipping point potential. In the Bulls’ first game without him, they mustered just 81 points at home against a swooning Sacramento Kings squad, shooting 8-for-37 from 3-point range in the process. The team’s need for secondary scoring outside of Zach LaVine glared

But, as Boylen has maintained all season, the Bulls are not going to change the way they play. They just need to play better.

“We gotta play faster, we gotta move the ball. I thought we had a couple possessions where the ball stuck. The ball can’t stick. We gotta move it, we gotta drive it,” Boylen said of the loss to the Kings before the Bulls’ Saturday night matchup with the Cavaliers in Cleveland. “I also think we missed some opportunities that we need to make.

“Our margin for error is not great. We have to make the plays we can make and make the shots we can make.”

For now, at least, the starting lineup won’t change (sorry #StartCoby crowd) — though Boylen said he’ll keep his rotation fluid. As for outside reinforcements being brought in?

“We have not talked about that. Doesn’t mean we won’t,” Boylen said when asked if the Bulls could actually pivot to ‘buying’ at the trade deadline, given their relative proximity to a playoff spot. “We’re in the middle of a really tough stretch of games, and a lot of games, so my focus has been on that.

“I love the guys we have,” he added. “And we’re gonna keep coaching and teaching the guys we have. I’ve got a good group, a coachable group.”

Absent from those adjectives was ‘interchangeable’ but that word has been ever-present in Boylen’s vocabulary through the ups and downs of this season. In his first full year at the helm, his primary goal remains clear.

“Because we’re establishing this system,” Boylen said when asked why, through thick and thin, the team’s playing style hasn’t changed, as it did last season after Boylen was hired. “Last year, we were tearing it down and then establishing it. Now we’re gonna keep establishing it.”

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