76ers

Sixers notes, quotes and tidbits: Joel Embiid rests; Landry Shamet learns from JJ Redick

ap_landry_shamet_sixers.jpg
AP Images

Sixers notes, quotes and tidbits: Joel Embiid rests; Landry Shamet learns from JJ Redick

CAMDEN, N.J. — Joel Embiid sat out the Sixers’ practice on Monday. In past years, that would be a cause for grave concern and frantic speculation.

This season, there’s no reason to read too much into it. Monday was simply a “load management” day for Embiid ahead of the team’s Blue-White scrimmage Tuesday night at the Palestra (7 p.m., NBCSP).

“We had two great days and [Tuesday] he’ll come in, and it’s sort of a game day for us,” head coach Brett Brown said. “We’ll come in, have a shootaround, then go to the Palestra and play in front of a fantastic crowd. We just felt like it would be good to let him have [Monday] to rest and we’ll jump back into it [Tuesday.]”

It wasn’t an entirely idle day for Embiid, however, who worked on his game after practice.

The Sixers will throw in a rest day for Embiid here and there, but he’s unrestricted for the first time in his career (see story).

Learning from the best 
After each day of training camp, rookie Landry Shamet and JJ Redick have been taking corner threes, shot-faking and pulling up, launching floaters — fine-tuning the skills shooters need to thrive in the NBA.

Shamet said he’s already picked up a lot from Redick, who is entering his 13th season in the NBA. Redick has made 1,464 three-point shots in his career, 30th most in NBA history. He’s a career 41.5 percent three-point shooter.

“He’s one of the best shooters, when you look back on it, in NBA history,” Shamet said. “I just try to take little bits and pieces of how he gets open, because he’s not the biggest guy, especially in the NBA. He’s really good with his feet, with his hands, knowing how to create space. So even when I’m guarding him, I’m picking things up on what he does to me and how he gets open.” 

Quotables
“Just not worrying about what people say. Not worrying about what the media says, fans. At the end of the day, this is his job. He loves playing ball. We all love what we do, so we can’t worry about what [the media] says or what the fans say or what people are saying on the internet — it doesn’t matter. He’s a great player and he wants to work hard. He knows greatness doesn’t take a week or a month or a year, it takes a long period of time.”

-Ben Simmons on the confidence he’s seen from Markelle Fultz 

“We obviously want him to get inside; he’s as good as anybody in the NBA. But to feel like that’s the only thing he can do is really naïve and I don’t think great coaching. So me coaching, it’s getting that balance of post up, post up, post up, dunk, dunk, dunk vs. he’s trailing in and nobody’s guarding him, shoot some threes and space him in corners as we put Markelle in a pick-and-roll. That interests me. As I said, so much of Joel’s interesting situation is he’s good at a lot. He really is skillful and has the ability to score in a lot of different ways.”

-Brett Brown on why he still wants Joel Embiid to shoot a good number of three-pointers 

More on the Sixers

Tobias Harris keeps the Sixers entertained on their bus ride to Toronto

Tobias Harris keeps the Sixers entertained on their bus ride to Toronto

Around 10:30 p.m. Monday night, we were blessed with a Ben Simmons Instagram Live video of "DJ Tobi," Tobias Harris, on the Sixers’ bus from the airport to the hotel.

“There’s a soul plane and there’s a soul bus. You’re on the soul bus, ya dig?”

DJ Tobi then proceeded to interview all the players, coaches and team personnel who entered the bus, as you can see in the videos below, which do contain profanity. 

“State your name, where are you from and where are you going,” head coach Brett Brown said Tuesday morning, laughing about last night’s bus ride. “And when there is a lull, he's got Spotify hooked up, and he's got some hip hop going on.”

“DJ Tobi,” Matisse Thybulle laughed, struggling to find the words for Harris’ performance. “He was putting on a show for everyone. … It was funny because you were seeing people out of their comfort zone.”

With the rigors of an NBA season, and through all the travel, bus rides and plane rides, the value of that type of team bonding can go underestimated.

“It's team bonding,” Simmons told NBC Sports Philadelphia. “We're a pretty close group. We like to have fun and there are a lot of different characters and personalities on the team. … It's awesome. But that's just who we are as a team, everyone just likes to have fun, everyone has good personalities and means well."

Of course, it’s easier when you’re winning, and the Sixers delivered one of their most impressive defensive performances of the year in their win over Brooklyn, led by Simmons and Thybulle.

“We could carry that good energy over,” Thybulle said of the win over the Nets. “But it definitely help to keeps things light because the travel gets tedious and boring.”

For the Brown, it’s yet another characteristic he’s seen blossom out of Harris.

“Leadership comes in all different forms … and he does it naturally,” Brown said.

“It’s what makes team sport, for me, as enjoyable as it gets, when you can win with people that you respect and trust that care. And this group does.”

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Sixers

Jameer Nelson, Phil Martelli react to troubling Delonte West video

ap-delonte-west.jpg
AP Images

Jameer Nelson, Phil Martelli react to troubling Delonte West video

Troubling video surfaced Monday on social media of former Saint Joseph’s great and NBA player Delonte West.

The 36-year-old appeared to get into a physical altercation and then was recorded spewing profanities with his hands behind his back. The video contains inappropriate language.

On Monday night, West’s former college teammate Jameer Nelson and head coach Phil Martelli voiced their concern and offered support.

West has opened up in the past about his battle with bipolar disorder and run-ins with the law. The most notable incident was when he was pulled over in Maryland on a three-wheeled motorcycle and subsequently arrested and charged with speeding and two counts of carrying a handgun.

When he was on Hawk Hill, West starred during his sophomore and junior seasons alongside Nelson. The duo led St. Joe’s on an incredible run in 2004. The Hawks were the No. 1 team in the country at one point and earned a one-seed in the NCAA Tournament. They lost in a thriller in the Elite 8 to two-seed Oklahoma State.

After choosing to forego his senior season, West was selected by the Boston Celtics with the 24th overall pick. He last played in the NBA with the Mavericks in 2012 and his professional career ended in 2015 after a brief stint in the G League.