Phillies

Roy Halladay is a Hall of Famer — Brandy Halladay, Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley and more react

Roy Halladay is a Hall of Famer — Brandy Halladay, Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley and more react

Roy Halladay is everything the Baseball Hall of Fame is about. 

Tuesday was a bittersweet night for everyone fortunate enough to cross paths with Doc or admire him from afar. Good luck finding anyone — a teammate, a rival, a writer, a fan, an exec — who would dream of saying a bad word about him.

Halladay leaves behind an uncommon legacy. As the words you'll read below further illustrate.

Brandy Halladay

"Being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame is every boy's dream. To stand on that stage in Cooperstown and deliver your acceptance speech in front of baseball's most enthusiastic fans is something that every baseball player aspires to achieve, and Roy was no exception. But that was not Roy's goal. It was not his goal to have those three letters after his signature. His goal was to be successful every single day of his 16-year career.  

Tonight's announcement is the end result of that effort. If only Roy were here to personally express his gratitude for this honor, what an even more amazing day this would be. I would like to extend special thanks to the baseball writers for the overwhelming percentage of votes that Roy received in his first year on the ballot. It means so much to me, Braden and Ryan."

Jimmy Rollins

"Congratulations to Roy and the Halladay family on Roy's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame, a place you knew he was destined for if you ever had the opportunity to witness his dominance! The days Doc would take the ball you knew you had to be your very best because there was zero doubt in anyone's mind that you would receive anything less from him!  

When Roy decided to come to Philadelphia, it was for one reason, to win a championship, and we wanted nothing more than to share in that moment of glory with him. Although we never accomplished that with him, it doesn't take away from all that he was able to accomplish during his career. 

Anyone that has ever heard the name Roy Halladay wishes he were here for us all to celebrate this moment of greatness and give thanks for the many memories he gave us on the playing field but even more importantly the ones we all got to create when he took off his Superman cape, gave that big ol' cheesy smile and made you feel like you had known him all your life! Congrats Doc, you are forever enshrined in baseball greatness!!"
                                      
Chase Utley

"One of the great pleasures of my career was being able to play behind a man like Roy Halladay. He was fierce. He was competitive. He was focused. But, most of all, he was great. Not just a great player but also a great teammate and a great friend. On the field, Roy wanted nothing more than to bring another championship to Philadelphia. Off the field, he wanted nothing more than to be the best husband and father he could be. He was someone I admired then and still do today. Jen and I send not just our congratulations to Brandy, Braden and Ryan, but also our thanks for sharing Roy with us and the city of Philadelphia."

Charlie Manuel

"People like to throw the word 'ace' around a lot, but Roy Halladay was a true 'ace.' In his time with the Phillies, he completed more games than anyone else in baseball, because his mindset was to pitch at least 9.0 innings. He was one of the most prepared guys I've ever been around and put more work into preparing for his next start than anyone I'd ever seen. Roy had great control with a tremendous arsenal of pitches and even if he didn't have his best stuff on a particular day, he'd still find a way for his team to win.  

He was an unquestioned leader on our team because with Roy it was never about him, but always about the people around him.  We all miss Roy every day and I'm so thankful to have called him a friend.  Congratulations to his whole family, especially Brandy, Braden and Ryan, on an honor that is very well deserved."

John Middleton

"Roy Halladay made an indelible, unforgettable mark on Phillies history during his time with us. From his perfect game to his postseason no-hitter to his Cy Young Award, his accomplishments in red pinstripes are nothing short of legendary, and his placement in the Hall of Fame is well deserved. Even more impressive was the way Roy carried himself off the field, always giving back not just to his teammates, but more so to his community, whether it was here in Philadelphia or in the Pinellas County area.  

For all he accomplished as a player and everything he stood for as a person, Doc will forever remain in the hearts of Phillies fans everywhere. My heartfelt congratulations go out Brandy, Braden and Ryan."

Mike Schmidt

"Roy was such a great family man and teammate, beloved by Phillies fans.  His teammates watched him train and I believe that pushed them to be better. He studied the game, its mechanics and mental side and was always willing to share his wealth of knowledge with anyone interested.  Roy was indeed a 'man for all seasons.' After retiring, he established an office at the minor league complex to mentor young Phillies, which was his secret love.  

I could go on and on, but I'll end by thanking the baseball writers who recognized Roy Halladay as a first-ballot member.  His family, friends and teammates only wish he could be here."

Cole Hamels

"I consider myself very fortunate to have played alongside Roy. He defined work ethic and how to prepare yourself to win. He wasn't about the spotlight and never wanted to take credit away from his teammates.  He now finally gets the credit he deserves. He completely reinvented himself in order to succeed at the major league level and in a game of failure he didn't lose much. If you did beat him, he would make sure you never did again.  

There's a part of him that I take with me every time I prepare for my games and step out onto that mound.  I congratulate Brandy, Braden and Ryan on Roy Halladay's election to the Baseball Hall of Fame. He had such an amazing impact on so many baseball players and future stars."

Kyle Kendrick

"Roy's numbers speak for themselves, but for me it was his work ethic in between starts and the way he treated and respected the game. I know Roy is smiling down on Brandy and the boys today."

Brad Lidge

"Roy was the ultimate competitor and workhorse. He (along with Chase) defined what it meant to be the first to show up and the last to leave. His work ethic was only topped by how brilliant his command was and how nasty his pitches were.  He went through the best hitters like a hot knife through butter and did it with ideal efficiency. He rose up on the biggest occasions of his career and he always gave you every ounce of energy he had."

Jayson Werth

"A well-deserved honor for the fiercest competitor I ever had the honor to take the field with. Roy is deeply missed but remembered forever."

Jean Segura hopes better lifestyle choices equal better season in 2020

Jean Segura hopes better lifestyle choices equal better season in 2020

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Phillies infielder Jean Segura bared his soul a little before Monday's first full-squad workout at Camp Clearwater.

He talked about the mental effect that his connection to teammate Andrew McCutchen's season-ending knee issue had on him last year. He talked about the difficulties that moving around the batting order around caused him. He talked about giving up whiskey and eating better this winter, about losing 14 pounds, all in hopes of having a better season in 2020.

"I have to enjoy what I do," a noticeably trimmer Segura said. "I think last year, I didn't do it too much because there was a lot of stress — Cutch went down, you know, a lot of situation going on with the lineup, you know, I'm hitting four, I never hit four in my life. So, there were a lot of things going on in the season that sometimes affect players."

Segura hit .280 with a .743 OPS last season, significant drops from the marks of .308 and .803 he'd averaged the previous three seasons.

His work at shortstop also slipped as he went from a plus-5 to a minus-5 in defensive runs saved, according to Fangraphs.

Declines like these might lead a front office to consider moving on from a player, but the Phillies figure to have Segura for a while as they owe him $45 million through 2022.

The Phils will look for ways to get more out of Segura this season and one of them is a position change. With newcomer Didi Gregorius taking over at shortstop, Segura figures to open the season at second base, a position he thrived at for Arizona in 2016. Segura will get some looks at third base during spring training, but he's never played there and when the curtain goes up on the regular season, he will likely be at second with Scott Kingery at third.

Segura, who turns 30 next month, said he was not slighted by the addition of Gregorius.

"We added another good player," he said. "As a professional baseball player, I have to understand what's best for the team, what's best for the organization. Whatever they want me to do, I'll do it. I just want to play and have fun."

Segura had a lot of fun the first two months of last season. He ended May hitting .301 with an .809 OPS. 

On June 3, in the first inning of a game at San Diego, the good vibes that Segura had been feeling went away when McCutchen went down with a season-ending ACL tear in his left knee. McCutchen blew out the knee in a rundown that resulted from Segura's not running out an infield popup.

McCutchen's injury was a huge loss for the Phillies. At the time, he had the second-best on-base percentage (.378) of any leadoff man in the majors. After the injury, Phillies leadoff men recorded at .295 on-base percentage, second worst in the majors, over the remainder of the season.

Though McCutchen absolved his teammate of any blame — and continues to do so — Segura was and still is bothered by the incident.

"It was frustrating for me," he said. "We were hot. I was hot. And when that happened because I didn't hustle down the line, a lot of people judged me for that. A lot of people didn't, but at the end of the day, it's what I think and I think I didn't hustle. I don't think it was my fault. He got hurt maybe because that day he was going to get hurt. At the end of the day, people looked at it like it was my fault, but it's a baseball game and you can't control a baseball game.

"But at the end of the day it affected my mentality because one of my teammates went down because I didn't run down the line. I thought about it a lot through the season. My body, my energy level went down. I was kind of frustrated about it because at that time he was hot, he was leading off and I was hitting second. It was like a two-punch right away and when you don't see that two-punch right away when we start a game, it's tough."

Segura spent the winter getting in better physical shape and he believes it will help him.

"You can put 14 pounds on your shoulder and go running and you'll feel how heavy it is when you get tired," he said. "That happens sometimes when you're overweight and you play shortstop and you stress a lot."

His off-season fitness program included eating better, sleeping more and giving up whiskey. He still might have an occasional glass of wine with his wife, but no more whiskey.

"I think everybody in this sport drinks whiskey and now I'm not drinking anymore," he said. "Now I feel pretty good. I feel excited and ready to go."

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J.T. Realmuto’s arbitration hearing headlines big week for Phillies

J.T. Realmuto’s arbitration hearing headlines big week for Phillies

CLEARWATER, Fla. — This is going to be a busy week for the Phillies.

The first full-squad workout of the spring takes place Monday. New manager Joe Girardi, general manager Matt Klentak and managing partner John Middleton will all speak to the full squad before it takes the field.

On Wednesday, J.T. Realmuto's salary arbitration case will be heard in Phoenix.

Closer Hector Neris' salary arbitration case will be heard Friday in Phoenix.

And Saturday marks the start of the Grapefruit League schedule. The Phillies travel to Lakeland that day to play the Detroit Tigers.

Realmuto's arbitration hearing is the most fascinating matter on tap for the week. The All-Star catcher, who made $5.9 million last season, is seeking $12.4 million. The Phillies have come in at $10 million. The arbitration panel will hear arguments from both sides and pick one figure or the other. There is no middle ground.

Management came out on top in six of the first seven arbitration cases heard around baseball this month, but Realmuto would seem to have a good shot at winning one for the players based on his strong 2019 season. In addition to making his second All-Star team, he was named catcher on the inaugural All-MLB team and won both the Gold Glove and Silver Slugger awards in the National League. He led all big-league catchers in hits, RBIs, total bases and extra-base hits while swatting a career-high 25 homers. He threw out 37 runners trying to steal, the most in the majors.

Realmuto is in his third and final year of arbitration and is scheduled to become a free agent after this season. To date, the highest-paid catcher in that class was Matt Wieters, who avoided a hearing with Baltimore and made $8.275 million 2015. Catcher Mike Napoli actually made more — $9.4 million — in a negotiated settlement with the Texas Rangers in 2012, but he was in his fourth year of arbitration because of his Super-Two status with the Anaheim Angels in 2009.

So, no matter how the arbitration panel rules, Realmuto's 2020 salary will be a record for an arbitration-eligible catcher.

Realmuto will be present for the hearing, as will Phillies officials. A ruling is generally made within 24 hours.

Hearings can sometimes create bad blood between a player and a team, but Realmuto has a pretty good handle on the situation. He knows it's just business and he's willing to go down this path to help boost the salary structure for his catching brethren.

Realmuto will remain a focal point of Phillies camp even after his hearing. The Phillies are hoping to preempt his free agency with a long-term contract extension that could come before or around opening day.

"Once we have a resolution to the one-year number, we'll come to the table and see if we can find common ground on a long-term deal," general manager Matt Klentak said. "I hope that we can. It would be nice to have some resolution prior to opening day just so it's not a distraction to mostly the player but even to us during the season. If we can't (negotiate an extension by opening day), we could always continue those talks during the season or even into free agency if we can."

Realmuto is expected to seek a contract extension of at least five years with an average value that could approach or top Joe Mauer's record $23 million AAV for a catcher.

The highest-paid Phillie ever is watching the Realmuto situation closely.

"I know there's a guy in (the clubhouse) that we need to sign to an extension," Bryce Harper said Sunday. "I think having a guy like J.T. for the next six years would help us.

"He's the best catcher in baseball. It all starts up the middle. You look at all the best teams in baseball. They usually have a pretty good staff and a really good catcher. So, I think having a guy like J.T. would be huge for us."

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