Josh Hart

Josh Hart drafted in 1st round, goes to Lakers; undrafted Kris Jenkins reportedly joins Wizards

Josh Hart drafted in 1st round, goes to Lakers; undrafted Kris Jenkins reportedly joins Wizards

Josh Hart heard his name called, while Villanova teammate Kris Jenkins did not.

Hart snuck into the first round of Thursday night's NBA draft, going 30th overall to the Utah Jazz. However, the Wildcat is headed to the Los Angeles Lakers, via a trade.

While Jenkins went undrafted, it looks like he'll have a shot with an NBA team. Jenkins will join the Washington Wizards this offseason to compete for a roster spot, according to a report by NBA.com's David Aldridge.

After winning the national title as a junior with Villanova, Hart collected plenty of accolades in a standout senior season. The 6-foot-5 wing was named a consensus first-team All-American, Big East Player of the Year and took home the Julius Erving award as the top small forward in the country.

For the 32-4 Wildcats, Hart, a Silver Spring, Maryland native, averaged 18.7 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 steals per game, while shooting 40.4 percent from three-point range.

"I'm my biggest critic," he said last week after a pre-draft workout for the Sixers. "I drive myself as much as I can. I demand perfection from myself."

As Hart travels west, Jenkins, on the other hand, will head home for his NBA opportunity. The 6-foot-6 forward, beloved for his buzzer-beating three-pointer to win Villanova its 2016 national championship, is from Upper Marlboro, Maryland. He worked out for the Wizards in early June. He also worked out for the Sixers on Tuesday.

"It's a blessing," he said after his session with the Wizards, via the Washington Post. "You always root for the hometown team, you always want them to do well. Honestly it's humbling to be in this position, to grow up in this area, to have some games here and play college ball here and then come back and work out for the Wizards."

After flirting with the NBA draft process following their title-winning season, both Hart and Jenkins decided to return to school for their senior campaigns.

They both took to Twitter on Thursday night following the draft — Hart in excitement, Jenkins more in a humorous manner.

Potential 2nd-round targets for Sixers in NBA draft: Small forwards/guards

Potential 2nd-round targets for Sixers in NBA draft: Small forwards/guards

We've already taken a look at the big men the Sixers could target in the second round (see story).

Here are the small forwards and guards who could be in the mix for the team in Round 2. 

Josh Hart: Shooting guard, 6-6/204, Villanova
Who knows more about what they would be getting in the Villanova champion than the Sixers?

Hart grew by leaps and bounds as a player during his four seasons on the Main Line, but the one thing that remained the same: his energy level. Hart plays with a certain intensity on both ends of the floor that will definitely give him a boost at the next level.

He paired that focus with his evolving skills to put together a stellar senior season. The versatile wing averaged 18.7 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 steals per game. Hart also shot 51.0 percent from the field and 40.4 percent from three-point land during a 2016-17 campaign in which he was named consensus first-team All-American, Big East Player of the Year and received the Julius Erving award as the top small forward in the country.

What Hart lacks in athleticism, he makes up for with his high basketball IQ, fierce competitive nature and winning pedigree (see story). After the dog days of "The Process," the Sixers could definitely use a guy with such a history of winning on their roster.

Dillon Brooks: Small forward, 6-7/215, Oregon
Even with Joel Embiid finally in action, the Sixers' offensive numbers were still pretty ugly last season. They ranked 25th in scoring, 27th in field goal percentage and 25th in three-point percentage.

Brooks wouldn't solve those woes by himself, but he's and offensive weapon who would absolutely help.

Brooks continued his improved shooting in his junior season with marks of 48.8 percent on field goals and 40.1 percent on three-pointers. He led a deep Ducks team with 16.1 points per game as he was named Pac-12 Player of the Year.

The skill to drain shots from each level of the floor and come through in the game's biggest moments will be attractive to a lot of teams in the middle of the second round (see story). With the Sixers' wing-needy situation, they might give the fiery Brooks a long look.

Jaron Blossomgame: Small forward/power forward, 6-7/214, Clemson
Sometimes you just need that dog on the basketball court. A guy that you know is going to get after it on each and every possession.

From an NBA standpoint, think Tony Allen or Avery Bradley.

That's what the Sixers would be getting in a guy like Blossomgame, whom they worked out last year before he opted to return to Clemson and again earlier this month.

His offense is going to come and go (his point production dipped slightly as a senior and his three-point shooting fell off a cliff — 44.1 percent to 25.5 percent). However, Blossomgame will put on that defensive hat night after night and get the job done.

He's a bundle of energy, and at nearly 24 years old has a strong frame that's already built for the league (see story).

For a Sixers team that allowed 108.1 points per game (24th in the NBA), Blossomgame should at least be under consideration.

Frank Mason III: Point guard, 5-11/185, Kansas
Not too many prospects under the 6-foot mark get legitimate NBA consideration. However, when you are this good and decorated as a collegiate player, teams tend to make an exception.

Let's just take a look at what Mason accomplished in 2016-17 alone: named consensus national player of the year, named consensus first-team All-American, won the Bob Cousy award (nation's top point guard), named Big 12 Player of the Year and first-team All-Big 12.

While college achievements are far from a guarantee of NBA success, Mason's makeup suggests he will find a way to survive at the next level. 

First off, he's an absolute pit bull on the court. Despite, his short stature, Mason is stocky and aggressive on both ends. He's also a solid shooter, particularly from long range. The PG finished his four seasons with the Jayhawks with career shooting marks of 45.4 percent from the field and 42.0 percent from long range (see story).

The 23-year-old is also a natural leader. Mason is vocal and a true extension of the coach on the floor. Even playing with other prime-time players at a program like Kansas, he was still a major reason the Jayhawks won 116 games during his time on campus.

Tyler Dorsey: Shooting guard, 6-4/180, Oregon
When considering instant offense off the bench in a second-round pick, few players might provide that option better than Dorsey. 

Dorsey averaged 14.6 points per game on 46.7 percent from the field and 42.3 percent from three-point range. Those numbers skyrocketed during the NCAA Tournament when the 21-year-old caught fire as he averaged 23.8 points in five games and shot 59.6 percent from the field and 60.6 percent from deep.

Dorsey does provide the option of playing either guard spot and noted he would be a good fit alongside Ben Simmons and the rest of the Sixers when the Pasadena, California native worked out for the team earlier this month (see story).

He doesn't offer much outside of the shooting department, but that's arguably the biggest issue for this young Sixers squad.

Others to keep an eye on: Duke SG Frank Jackson, Gonzaga PG Nigel Williams-Goss, Florida State SF Dwayne Bacon.

From Villanova legend to NBA hopeful, Josh Hart 'demands perfection' from himself

From Villanova legend to NBA hopeful, Josh Hart 'demands perfection' from himself

CAMDEN, N.J. — There are questions that have come up frequently during the Sixers' pre-draft workouts:

When are the top picks coming to Camden?

Is Josh Hart working out?

The Villanova standout donned a Sixers jersey and took the court with former teammates Darryl Reynolds and Dylan Ennis with head coach Jay Wright watching from the sidelines on Thursday (see story)

Hart worked out for the Sixers last year before deciding to play his senior year at Villanova and defend the Wildcats' NCAA championship. 

"Everything about the NBA went out the window," Hart said of his return to school. "I knew if I decided to go back to 'Nova to have to be all in on 'Nova. ... The NBA never crawled into my mind until the end of the year."

Hart increased his scoring production to 18.7 points and 40.4 percent three-point shooting, along with 6.4 rebounds and 2.9 assists. Hart left Villanova as the only player in school history with more than 1,900 points, 800 rebounds, 250 assists and 150 steals.

Hart actually has been adjusting his shot since the end of the season. He wasn't thrilled with how they went down in the workout but hopes the Sixers noticed the alterations he has made. 

"I didn't shoot the ball too well today," Hart said. "That comes with the territory. Changing the shot, you go through growing pains and today was a little bit of a growing pain. Even if you miss shots, it shows my jumpshot is different. It's more fluent, smoother."

The Sixers are well aware of Hart's game beyond a workout. They have had the opportunity to get a close look at him over the last four years and also watched him at a pro day. 

"He was very impressive," Sixers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said last week. "But it was a one-on-none workout, so we're not going to get a lot out of that other than the fact that he had tremendous stamina throughout. I will say this, he didn't have a lot of breaks in the course of the workout. He's a talent. He's going to be a solid pro for somebody. We've seen a lot of video, we've seen a lot of live impressions. He's going to be a nice NBA player."

Hart, a projected second-round pick, also worked out with Pacers, Nets, Magic, Jazz, Suns, Thunder, Lakers and Trail Blazers before the Sixers. He still has the Hawks, Spurs and Suns left on his schedule. 

His road to NBA consideration has been a long one from his high school days when he doesn't think "anyone knew who I was" heading into college.

"What other people say can only fuel you so much," Hart said. "It has to come from you. If it doesn't, you won't be successful. ... I'm my biggest critic. I drive myself as much as I can. I demand perfection from myself."

Hart plans to watch the draft locally at Two Liberty Place in Philadelphia. He expects to feel more anxious than nervous, pointing out this is the first time he does not know where he will be playing basketball next.

"To be the number one pick, I think that's probably what I'm hoping for," Hart joked of his draft night expectations. "I wish I knew where I was going. The goal is to get your name called."