Red Sox

Patriots provided one blueprint for handling Alex Cora, but Red Sox ignored it

Patriots provided one blueprint for handling Alex Cora, but Red Sox ignored it

Let us imagine, for a moment, a scenario.

It's 2007, and the Patriots have just been nailed for stealing opposing signals despite an explicit league directive banning the practice. With national reporters swarming Foxboro like the Zerg, owner Robert Kraft assesses the damage to his brand, the importance of integrity to his family, and makes a heart-rending decision -- he must fire Bill Belichick.

Who can blame him? Belichick broke the rules and brought shame to the organization. Not even a pile of Lombardi Trophies justifies the long-term damage to the team's reputation. And so with vampires at his gate demanding blood, Kraft gives it to them and sacrifices his Hall of Fame coach.

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We now know two things, of course. One is that Kraft did not fire Belichick. The other is that it was inarguably the right decision, one that continues to pay dividends more than a decade later. While there's not much the Patriots can do about taunts that they're cheaters, there's also little doubt that they're the NFL's greatest dynasty.

There's a reason Belichick guest-hosted the NFL Network's series on the league's top 100 players, and there's a reason why when all is said and done, the dominant impression of this 20-year run won't be Spygate or Deflategate, but the unprecedented, record-breaking partnership between Belichick and Tom Brady.

None of that happens if Kraft pulls the plug in 2007. But he stood his ground despite intense public pressure, and has since reaped the rewards.

This alternate history, this road not taken, feels relevant today, given a very different choice made by Red Sox ownership in response to a remarkably similar scandal.

On Tuesday, the club and manager Alex Cora "mutually agreed to part ways," which is corporate jargon for, "we have unilaterally decided to part ways." A bombshell MLB report had just fingered Cora as the mastermind of a sign-stealing scheme in Houston involving replay cameras, dugout monitors, and one resonant trash can.

The Red Sox digested this report for a day before announcing Cora's departure. They based their decision, according to ownership, solely on his actions in Houston and what was laid out in the report. It doubtlessly didn't help his cause that he's facing a lengthy suspension, probably at least a year, and maybe longer.

It's hard to criticize the Red Sox for acting decisively; Cora's actions embarrassed the organization. And far be it from me to suggest that anyone, in any sport, belongs in the same sentence as Belichick.

But I'm coming to believe the Red Sox should've stood by their man à la the Patriots, especially since the behavior they found so egregious occurred while he worked as a subordinate for another franchise.

Add their strangely smug confidence that the commissioner's investigation into their own championship season of 2018 will exonerate them (and therefore Cora, too, to a degree), and a case can be made that they fired him out of expediency at the expense of their long-term interests.

"They had no choice!" many have argued. And to that I say, why?

I don't buy for a second that Cora had lost his clubhouse. My guess is the players were well aware of his actions in Houston -- he didn't try to hide his admiration for co-conspirator Carlos Beltran and his ability to decipher signs by any means possible. Whatever Cora oversaw in Boston, it doesn't sound like there was much clubhouse dissent.

It's hard to overstate Cora's importance to the organization. He united disparate departments and communities like no one before him. He's the rare ex-player who embraces and understands new-school analytics. He's bilingual, which allows him to bridge gaps in a melting-pot clubhouse.

I've had half a dozen people at all levels of the organization tell me how much he'll be missed, all with a similar story -- he made everyone feel important, even the junior nobodies. He spent some of his last hours as a Red Sox employee consulting with player development about the farm system. He is personable, passionate, and driven, and he had a hand in everything.

Star shortstop Xander Bogaerts didn't waste words when asked what kind of manager the Red Sox should hire next.

"Someone like him," he said.

As scandalous and raw as this feels now, time has a way of smoothing edges and soothing nerves. A year from now, after a lengthy contrition tour, Cora might've been able to resume his duties. We'll never know if he could've survived the fallout, because the Red Sox never gave him the chance.

That's certainly their right, but imagine how different the Patriots would look today if they had reached the same conclusion more than a decade ago.

Here's when to expect MLB's ruling in Red Sox sign-stealing investigation

Here's when to expect MLB's ruling in Red Sox sign-stealing investigation

It looks like the Boston Red Sox will have to wait even longer to hear the results of MLB's ongoing investigation into the 2018 team's alleged sign-stealing.

Commissioner Rob Manfred stated back on Feb. 16 he expected the investigation to conclude by the end of this week. On Tuesday, though, Jon Heyman of MLB Network reported an announcement likely won't be made until early March.


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Of course, that means a ruling will come only a couple of days later than anticipated, but there's no doubt Sox fans are growing frustrated with the constant delays.

MLBPA executive director Tony Clark said Tuesday the league has concluded its interviews for the investigation.

“As of right now, we understand that the interviews that they were going to have and did have as well as the information they were gathering from beyond the player interviews has all happened,” Clark said, per The Boston Globe. “Now we’re just waiting for the decision itself.”

Multiple Red Sox players claim the 2018 team did nothing wrong and that there shouldn't be a punishment coming their way. If MLB does hand down punishments, the expectation is that they won't be severe.

Red Sox prospect quarantined amid coronavirus concerns

Red Sox prospect quarantined amid coronavirus concerns

The Boston Red Sox are playing it safe with one of their prospects during spring training. Not because of anything injury-related, but because of the coronavirus.

Taiwanese right-hander Chih-Jung Liu is being quarantined in a hotel room, as a team spokesman said the organization is using “an overabundance of caution" to guard against the virus, per The Boston Globe.

Liu, who arrived to the United States for his first spring training after being signed in October, provided an update on his status on his Facebook page. According to The Globe, the 20-year-old says he is "being delivered three meals a day, doing some weight training, and going for an occasional run." He's also spending his time online “watching information about the team” and reading.

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Taiwan currently has 31 confirmed cases of coronavirus to the United States' 57, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Liu flew from Taiwan to San Francisco prior to joining the Red Sox in Fort Myers, Fla. for spring training.

Liu expects to come out of quarantine and finally join his teammates on Saturday.