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Australia’s about to get tough on dopers

ARMSTRONG

FILE - This July 5, 2004 file photo shows U.S. Postal Service team leader and five-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, third from right, framed by his teammates as the pack rides during the second stage of the 91st Tour de France cycling race between Charleroi and Namur, Belgium. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency says 11 of Lance Armstrong’s former teammates testified against him in its investigation of the cyclist, revealing “the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.” USADA will deliver its reasoned decision against Armstrong later Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, a summary of the facts it used to hand him a lifetime suspension and erase his seven Tour de France titles. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena, File)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In response to the backlash against cyclist Lance Armstrong and the UCI, the Australian Olympic Committee is proposing unprecedented measures to ensure its athletes will never consider doping.

Simply put: the committee with ask team members to sign a declaration stating they have no “doping history.” If someone gets caught lying, they go to jail for up to seven years. If they don’t sign, well...

“If they don’t sign, they don’t go to the games, they won’t be selected,” AOC President John Coates explained to the AP. “What I don’t want is for the AOC to have egg on its face like cycling has.

”We’re trying to make athletes realize the real risks of doping are not just being caught at the time of testing, but being caught with other evidence. We want to make sure there’s no hidden treasures back there.”

Coates will propose the idea at a Nov. 16 AOC executive board meeting. If passed, the proposition would take effect for all athletes, coaches, officials, and other team members starting at the 2014 Sochi Games.