Skip navigation
Favorites
Sign up to follow your favorites on all your devices.
Sign up

Once again, Washington’s Metro will close before a Nationals playoff game ends

Virginia Man Arrested In Terror Plot To Bomb Washington DC Subways

WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 27: Metro trains arrive at the Gallery Pl - Chinatown Station October 27, 2010 in Washington, DC. Farooque Ahmed, a naturalized US citizen originally from Pakistan, of Ashburn, Virginia, was arrested by the FBI for attempting to assist others whom he believed to be members of al-Qaeda in planning multiple bombings at Metrorail stations in the Washington, DC, area. He was taken into custody earlier this morning. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Getty Images

We’ve seen this before: the Washington D.C. Metro system is part of the narrative in the runup to a Washington Nationals playoff game.

The Metro always closes at night -- it’s usually midnight if I remember correctly -- but now it’s earlier than that due to ongoing renovations to the increasingly antiquated subway system. And, it should be noted, by the transit authority’s (WMATA) refusal to extend service for late Nats games. As a result, the last train out of the Navy Yard Metro station, near Nats Park, will be 11:20 or so. The Dodgers-Nats game tonight will not start until after 8PM so, in all likelihood, the train will shut down before the vast majority of the 41,000 or so baseball fans would prefer to leave for home.

As this story in the Washington Post notes, the Nationals blog TalkNats.com has established the Twitter hashtag, #NatsRide, to help connect Nats fans for carpooling and stuff. Which, in addition to being nice, helps the optics of it all, as Nats fans took a shellacking in the press and on social media in 2014 when there was a mass exodous during Game 2 of the NLDS against the Giants, which went 18 innings.

Hopefully that’s successful. And, even if it’s not, hopefully people will not engage in fan-shaming those who do have to leave early. It’s not their fault that the Nationals built a ballpark that depended greatly on an overtaxed and, in many ways, inadequate transit system. And it’s worth noting that the people who tend to do the most shaming about such things -- the press -- don’t pay to go to games, get to expense taxi rides and uber rides or, if they park, get free media parking, that they don’t have their kids in tow and that they don’t have to wake up early the next morning to go to work and get those kids off to school.

It’s a tough situation all around. Here’s hoping Nats fans are able to get through it OK.

Follow @craigcalcaterra