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Glen Davis: Doc Rivers ‘lucky as hell’ to win 2008 championship with Celtics

NBA Finals Game 2:  Boston Celtics v Los Angeles Lakers

LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 06: Glen Davis #11 and head coach Doc Rivers of the Boston Celtics celebrate near the side line against the Los Angeles Lakers in Game Two of the 2010 NBA Finals at Staples Center on June 6, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)

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Glen Davis -- who played for Doc Rivers on the Celtics and Clippers -- apparently isn’t on the best terms with his former coach.

Davis hasn’t played in the NBA since 2015, in part due to an ankle injury he suffered with the Clippers. And that has him bringing up thoughts on Rivers predating Boston’s 2008 championship.

Davis on In the Zone with Chris Broussard, as transcribed by Jay King of MassLive:

“I don’t like what he’s doing right now,” Davis said. “I don’t like his organization, what he’s doing, his teams. We had something in ’08 and that was it. You know what I mean? That’s what that is. So far, like, I didn’t like how the way he handled me on my exit. Yeah, hold yourself accountable, but at the same time I had a broken ankle. I won a championship with you and you don’t even really call me. I’ve got to beg you to call me. My agent has to beg you to call me. My ankle’s broke. And you just told me -- they pulled me to the side when I played against Houston and told me, ‘You’re not playing the way you need to play. You’re not doing this.’ My ankle was broke. My ankle was broke. And they’re shooting me up, shooting me up, shooting me up every day to play. My ankle was broke.”

“They just did an X-ray (for the ankle),” added Davis. “They didn’t do an MRI. And it was just like, ‘Oh, can you run? Can you play?’ The next day they had me working out after I broke my ankle. They had me trying to play Game 7. It was crazy and I’m just not feeling that. When you win a championship with somebody, you don’t treat nobody like that. No matter if it’s a business or not, because it’s bigger than basketball between us, Doc. I have never left you at the altar. I’ve never left you at the altar. You know what I mean? I’ve never left. You go get Spencer Hawes, he does nothing. You’ve got to trade him. You’ve still got me on the bench knowing that I can play, but you still go play Spencer Hawes knowing that you’re just trying to cover your own butt because Spencer’s not panning out the way you wanted him to pan out. And I just don’t like that. I’m not feeling that.”


“Because what Doc had in ’08 was special,” Davis said on the podcast. “And he was lucky as hell. Lucky as hell. The year before that they were wearing trash bags (in the crowd). ... But then the next year they win it, now he’s one of the best coaches ever? I’m just not feeling that, you know what I mean? You give credit to KG. You give credit to Paul Pierce. You give credit to Ray Allen. Those are the guys that made sure whatever Doc needed to be done got done. And so now it’s easy for Doc to do his job.

Davis is correct: Rivers was on the hot seat before the Celtics traded for Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen and won the championship.

But maybe that improved talent just gave Rivers an opportunity to show how great of a coach he was all along.

Whatever fits your narrative.