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Martellus Bennett pledges to donate jersey sales profit

New York Jets v New England Patriots

FOXBORO, MA - DECEMBER 24: Martellus Bennett #88 of the New England Patriots celebrates after scoring a touchdown against the New York Jets during the first half at Gillette Stadium on December 24, 2016 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

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The Packers’ official online team store is full of jersey options for potential buyers, its stock including Aaron Rodgers’ top-selling No. 12, Jordy Nelson’s No. 87, Randall Cobb’s 18 and Clay Matthews’ 52.

Martellus Bennett’s jersey is not yet available.

There is added reason for that soon to change.

The new Packers tight end announced Saturday an incentive for fans interested in wearing his No. 80. He pledged on social media not to pocket a cent off whatever commission he’ll receive from jersey sales in 2017, allocating his profit instead to “after school programs that I’m working to put together.”

He added that his older brother, Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett, inspired him.

Michael pledged this month to donate all endorsement money earned in 2017 “to help rebuild minority communities through s.t.e.a.m programs, as well as initiatives that directly affect women of color in hopes that we can create more opportunities for our youth and build a brighter future.” He also committed 50 percent of his jersey profit to fund inner-city garden projects.

Fans generally have to be mindful when investing in a player jersey.

As a hypothetical, former Packers running back Eddie Lacy’s jersey was $99.95 to begin the year. After his contract expired on March 9, it’s down to $69.97. A player’s roster longevity is often directly correlated to the jersey’s value.

Martellus does not necessarily shine in that category. He is 30. As part of a three-year contract he signed this month, the Packers can avoid paying him a $2 million roster bonus if he’s released before the start of the 2018 league year. In 2019, he is due a $5.65 million salary.

But the factors to purchase his or his brother’s jersey now extend beyond that.

They’ve turned profit into philanthropy.

Notably, the brothers are neither the first nor surely last NFL players to make such commitments. Free-agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick, for example, announced he would donate all jersey profits in 2016 amid a surge in sales.

“The only way I can repay you for the support is to return the favor by donating all the proceeds I receive from my jersey sales back into the communities!” Kaepernick said on Instagram. “I believe in the people, and WE can be the change!”

Others around the league, including Chargers safety Darrell Stuckey, have donated game checks to specific causes.