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Kevin Durant responds to LeBron James’ ‘jealous’ comment: ‘LeBron can do whatever he wants’

Oklahoma City Thunder v Miami Heat

MIAMI, FL - DECEMBER 25: Kevin Durant #35 of the Oklahoma City Thunder drives against LeBron James #6 of the Miami Heat during a Christmas Day game on December 25, 2012 at American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory copyright notice: Copyright NBAE 2012 (Photo by Issac Baldizon/NBAE via Getty Images)

Issac Baldizon

LeBron James recently expressed his jealousy of how much Kevin Durant shoots.

LeBron attempts 16.2 shots per game (19th in the NBA) to Durant’s 19.5 (third in the NBA), so there is a certainly a significant difference for the leading MVP candidates. Neither player is putting up empty numbers – nothing close to that. Although I think he meant to honestly reveal the downside to his own situation, LeBron also – implicitly and only slightly – discredited Durant’s scoring average (30.0 to LeBron’s 25.9). After all, it’s easier to score more when you can shoot more.

It was only a matter of time until Durant was asked to respond.

Durant, via Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman:

“What he say?” Durant asked, rhetorically.

“How can I not see it? It’s been on CNN. It’s been on ABC, FOX Sports. Man, it’s been everywhere. Ya’ll blowing that out of proportion, man. I mean, I’m pretty sure, matter of fact, I’m 100 percent sure LeBron can do whatever he wants.”

That is a
great answer.

LeBron can do whatever he wants. With a clever comment, Durant spins this back on LeBron, whose initial comments now seem like a humblebrag. Ugh, I wish I could score more, but I’m just too good a teammate.

Of course, that’s only one portion of what LeBron said.

I mostly agree with the rest of Durant’s comment, that some are blowing LeBron’s comments out of proportion. They’re certainly interesting and worthy of discussion, but I don’t think they’re a call for change.

As I said before, I think the denigration of Durant’s numbers was only a side effect of LeBron’s main purpose: to discuss his internal conflict. LeBron wants to play within the Heat’s system, a system that admittedly makes him the focal point, and he also wants to shoot more. That’s fine, and LeBron clearly chooses the former more than the latter.

We all face dilemmas like that in our own lives. I want to eat all the ice cream in my freezer right now (peanut cup and pretzel), but I also want to be relatively healthy. I have to choose between two things I want, and LeBron does the same with playing within Miami’s system and shooting more. It’s compelling to hear him discuss the road he’s not taking.

It’s just unfortunate Durant was painted as doing something wrong, because he’s certainly not.