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Joanne Reid, niece of Eric Heiden, makes Olympic team

IBU Biathlon World Cup - Women's Sprint

RUHPOLDING, GERMANY - JANUARY 14: Joanne Reid of USA competes during the IBU Biathlon World Cup Women’s Sprint on January 14, 2017 in Ruhpolding, Germany. (Photo by Laurent Salino/Agence Zoom/Getty Images)

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The U.S. Olympic women’s biathlon team is set, and includes the niece of the arguably the greatest U.S. Winter Olympian of all time.

Joanne Reid, whose uncle is five-time 1980 Olympic speed skating champion Eric Heiden, was named to the team along with Emily Dreissigacker and Maddie Phaneuf on Thursday.

All are first-time Olympians.

They join the already qualified Susan Dunklee, Clare Egan to complete the five-woman team.

Biathlon is the only Winter Olympic sport where the U.S. has yet to earn a medal.

Reid’s mom is Beth Heiden Reid, a 1980 Olympic speed skating bronze medalist (on a bum ankle) and world champion road cyclist.

In 1983, Heiden Reid won an NCAA individual cross-country skiing championship two years after picking up the sport.

Then in 2010, she competed at the U.S. Cross-Country Skiing Championships at age 50, beating her then-17-year-old daughter in a pair of races.

“When I was 13 or 14, my parents and I did a bike tour across California,” Reid, whose middle name is Firesteel, said in 2017. “The last day was 110 miles, and crossed several mountain passes that are in the famous California Death Ride. Two days later, I ran my first half marathon. That’s about what it’s like to grow up with a mother like mine.”

Reid skied for the University of Colorado from 2010-13, winning an NCAA title like her mom, then switched to biathlon in 2015 after watching a broadcast of the sport for the first time with friends of her parents earlier that year.

Her best individual World Cup finish is 29th from last season, when she was one of three U.S. women to earn World Cup points.

Reid underwent two heart procedures that took seven total hours last summer, according to her Instagram.

“I remember every minute of it -- because firstly, I was awake through both procedures, and secondly because, you know, they saved my athletic career,” she posted.

Dreissigacker, 29, is the daughter of two Olympic rowers and the younger sister of Sochi Olympic biathlete Hannah Dreissigacker.

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