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Looking at DaMarcus Beasley’s evolving career situation, and the odds of an MLS return

APER SOC BEASLEY

SOCCER/FUTBOL APERTURA 2011 JORNADA 11: SAN LUIS VS PUEBLA Action photo of DaMarcus Bealsey of Puebla, diring week 11 game of the Apertura 2011./Foto de accion de DaMarcus Beasley de Puebla, durante juego de la semana11 del Apertura 2011. 01 October 2011. MEXSPORT/ISAAC ORTIZ

ISAAC ORTIZ

It appears that Herculez Gomez is not the only Liga MX-stationed U.S. internationals on the move.

Reports are out this morning that talks have broken down between Puebla and DaMarcus Beasley, which has resulted in the 31-year-old midfielder – Or should we call him “defender” based on his recent, successful appearances for Jurgen Klinsmann’s national team? – being put on the Liga MX club’s transfer list.

So he could move within Mexico or he’s free to move elsewhere. The man has played professionally in six countries already, so clearly there’s not fear factor when it comes to changing of national address.

All that said, don’t bet on a return to MLS.

We know these things can and do change, but when Marc Stein and I talked to Beasley late last week for Sundays’ Soccer Today podcast, it certainly didn’t sound like a return to his starting line league was even in Beasley’s thoughts. (The Beasley interview begins at about the 38th minute of the link; but if you back it up a few minutes, you’ll be treated to the smooth voice of Ian Darke, and who can’t use a little more of that in their life?)

WhatBeasley said about the contract negotiations that were happening at the time:

I would like to stay in Mexico, and hopefully we can make that happen. … I feel comfortable there. The teams, they know me there. I feel very comfortable in Puebla. The city, the people. I love my experience there.”

Recalling that it all started for Beasley as a Chicago Fire man back in 2000 (he was property of the Galaxy first but never made an appearance), I asked if Major League Soccer would, at some point, become a larger consideration. I know we all love to think that our domestic heroes will complete the circle and finish up the league, prodigal son-style. But …

If I did end my career in Mexico, so be it, if it happens that way. As far as MLS, I don’t see myself coming back to MLS, but you never know.”