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Tuesday And-1 links: The new NBA luxury tax and you

Oklahoma City Thunder James Harden durin

Oklahoma City Thunder James Harden during practice in preparation for game four of the NBA Finals June 18, 2012 at the American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/GettyImages)

AFP/Getty Images

Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• There’s a great post from Mike Prada at SBN that starts to explain why traditional big-spending teams — Lakers, Knicks, Celtics, Mavericks — are making moves now to lower payroll, because they are scared of the increased taxes that will kick in starting in 2014. He has a great paragraph explaining the implications:

As an exercise, consider the Los Angeles Lakers. Last year, they had a payroll of nearly $86 million. Under the old system, which was in effect, the Lakers owed just under $16 million in luxury-tax fees. Under the new system, though, they would have owed $7.5 million for the first $5 million over the tax, $8.75 million for the next five million, $12.5 million for the next five million and $3.25 million for the final $1 million. Right there, that’s a $32.25 million tax bill. In addition, since the Lakers were over the tax in four of the past five years, they would have owed an additional $5 million at each juncture. That leaves them with a tax bill of over $52 million for being $16 million over the threshold.

• Despite the future tax implications, James Harden expects to sign a new contact with Thunder this summer. Nobody doubts he will, but there is a big bill coming for the Thunder down the line and they will make changes.

• My take on those last two notes — the owners fought hard to have this heavy tax and flattening of payrolls in the NBA, thinking it would flatten out the salary levels (it will) and give more teams a chance. To force some parity. But what it will do — whether you built your team like the Heat or Thunder did — is force you to break it up sooner or have stars with no real talent around them. Is that good for the league? Especially a league that sells stars? I think it backfires.

• Tyler Zeller talks about going through the workout process leading up to the draft with Zach Lowe at SI. And they talk fashion.

• As expected, the Blazers extended a qualifying offer to Nicolas Batum. Other teams like him but the Blazers will not let him go.

• Tyreke Evans has told the Sacramento Kings he doesn’t want to play the small forward next year. The smart money is he doesn’t play for the Kings next year — his name comes up in all kinds of trade rumors.

• As was expected, San Antonio Spurs guard Patty Mills has been named to the Australian Olympic basketball team.

• However, Bobcats big man Byron Mullens will not play for Great Britain in the Olympics due to a toe injury.

• LeBron is back being active on twitter and has more followers than you.

• Taj Gibson’s birthday cake was a picture of him dunking on Dwyane Wade. Nice.

• With Danny Ferry signing on to be GM of the Hawks, the 76ers are scaling back their search for the guy who will take over for Rod Thorn.

• Danny Ainge talks about how the Celtics overachieved this year. His word, not mine.

• A Q&A with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

• By the way, Thorn said the 76ers would be drafting the best player available regardless of position. Every team should do this (or use a tier system). Drafting for need works in the NFL, but the NBA draft is a different animal.

Here’s a breakdown of how the appeal of the arbiter’s ruling on the Jeremy Lin/waiver/Bird rights ruling will go down. Big implications for the Knicks offseason on the line.

• Thunder co-owner Aubrey McClendon is having some business troubles.

RIP to Ted Luckenbill, the former University of Houston college star who played in Wilt Chamberlain’s 100 point game.